Papers of Thomas Kirkpatrick Monro, c1895-1960, Professor of Practice of Medicine, University of Glasgow, 1913-1936

Archive Collection

Scope and Content

Manuscripts from the Monro collection relating to printed editions of the works of Sir Thomas Browne undated

Administrative / Biographical History

Thomas Kirkpatrick Monro was educated at Arbroath High School then went to the  University of Glasgow, where he obtained his Master of Arts degree. After qualifying he studied in Vienna, Berlin and Paris. He was Emeritus Regius Professor of Practice of Medicine, at the University of Glasgow from  1913-1936 . He held the positions of Honorary Fellow and Ex. President in many organizations including: Royal Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, Glasgow; Association of Physicians of Great Britain and Ireland and the Royal Medico-Chirurgical Society of Glasgow. He was also a member of the British Medical Association and of the Executive Committee for the Orphan Homes of Scotland and Colony of Epileptics. Monro held the offices of Pathologist, Victoria Infirmary; Examiner in Pathology, Glasgow University; Examiner in Medicine at the universities of Dublin, Durham and St. Andrews; Physician and Clinical Lecturer, Glasgow Royal Infirmary; manager of Glasgow Royal Infirmary; Director, Glasgow Royal Maternity and Women’s Hospital; professor of Medicine and Dean of the Medical Faculty, St. Mungo's College; Examiner for the Fellowship and for the License of the Royal Faculty of Physicians and Surgeons, Glasgow; editor for the Glasgow Medical Journal; President of the Scottish Western Asylums Research Institute; Senior Physician, Western Infirmary, Glasgow; President of Medial and Dental Defence Union of Scotland, Ltd.; Governor, Royal Technical College, Glasgow; Chairman of Glasgow Workmen’s Dwellings Co. Ltd.; and was a Major in Royal Army Medical Corps (T.F.). Monro’s publications include: History of the Chronic Degenerative Diseases of the Central Nervous System (1895), Raynaud’s Disease (1899), Manual of Medicine, 5th edition (1925), The Physician as Man of Letters, Science and Action (1933), An Unpublished Letter of Sir Thomas Browne (1921), and The Early Editions of Sir Thomas Browne (1923).

Source: Who Was Who, Vol. V, 1951-1960ed. 1961.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605-1682 ), was an English author in various fields of learning including Medicine, religion, science and the esoteric. He graduated from Pembroke College, Oxford in  1626  and received a medical doctorate from the University of Leiden in  1633 . He settled in Norwich in  1636  where he practiced medicine and lived until his death in  1682 . His first well-known work bore the Latin title Religio Medici (The Religion of a Physician). This work was circulated in manuscript among his friends, and it caused Browne some surprise and embarrassment when an unauthorised edition appeared in  1642 , since the work contained a number of religious speculations that might be considered unorthodox. An authorised text with some of the controversial matter removed appeared in  1643 . In  1646 , Browne published Pseudodoxia Epidemica, or, Enquiries into Very Many Received Tenets, and commonly Presumed Truths, whose title refers to the prevalence of false beliefs and vulgar errors. It is a sceptical collection that deals with a number of legends circulating at the time, which it treats in a paradoxical and witty manner. The book is scientifically significant because its arguments were some of the first to cast doubt on the widely-believed hypothesis of spontaneous generation or abiogenesis. In 1658 Browne published together two Discourses relating to Hydriotaphia, or Urn Burial, brought about by the discovery of some Bronze Age burials in earthenware vessels found in Norfolk. These inspired Browne to meditate upon the funerary customs of the world and the fleetingness of earthly fame and reputation. In 1671 King Charles II, accompanied by the Royal Court, visited Norwich. Obliged to honour a notable local, the name of the Mayor of Norwich was proposed to the King for knighthood. The Mayor, however, declined the honour and proposed the name of Browne instead. Sir Thomas Browne died on his 77th birthday, October 19th 1682. His skull became the subject of dispute when in 1835 his lead coffin was accidentally re-opened by workmen. It was not re-interred until 4th July 1922 when it was registered in the church of Saint Peter Mancroft as aged 316 years.

Sir Thomas Browne (1605-1682 ), was an English author in various fields of learning including Medicine, religion, science and the esoteric. He graduated from Pembroke College, Oxford in  1626  and received a medical doctorate from the University of Leiden in  1633 . He settled in Norwich in  1636  where he practiced medicine and lived until his death in  1682 . His first well-known work bore the Latin title Religio Medici (The Religion of a Physician). This work was circulated in manuscript among his friends, and it caused Browne some surprise and embarrassment when an unauthorised edition appeared in  1642 , since the work contained a number of religious speculations that might be considered unorthodox. An authorised text with some of the controversial matter removed appeared in  1643 . In  1646 , Browne published Pseudodoxia Epidemica, or, Enquiries into Very Many Received Tenets, and commonly Presumed Truths, whose title refers to the prevalence of false beliefs and vulgar errors. It is a sceptical collection that deals with a number of legends circulating at the time, which it treats in a paradoxical and witty manner. The book is scientifically significant because its arguments were some of the first to cast doubt on the widely-believed hypothesis of spontaneous generation or abiogenesis. In 1658 Browne published together two Discourses relating to Hydriotaphia, or Urn Burial, brought about by the discovery of some Bronze Age burials in earthenware vessels found in Norfolk. These inspired Browne to meditate upon the funerary customs of the world and the fleetingness of earthly fame and reputation. In 1671 King Charles II, accompanied by the Royal Court, visited Norwich. Obliged to honour a notable local, the name of the Mayor of Norwich was proposed to the King for knighthood. The Mayor, however, declined the honour and proposed the name of Browne instead. Sir Thomas Browne died on his 77th birthday, October 19th  1682 . His skull became the subject of dispute when in 1835 his lead coffin was accidentally re-opened by workmen. It was not re-interred until 4th July 1922 when it was registered in the church of Saint Peter Mancroft as aged 316 years.

Arrangement

The arrangement of this material reflects the original order in which it was received.

Conditions Governing Access

Open

Acquisition Information

Bequeathed by T K Monro

Other Finding Aids

Further details of the collection are available via the department's online printed book catalogue at the University of Glasgow Library, Department of Special Collections  http://special.lib.gla.ac.uk/manuscripts/ .

Alternative Form Available

No known copies

Conditions Governing Use

Applications for permission to quote should be sent to the Keeper of Special Collections.

Reproduction subject to usual conditions: educational use and condition of documents.

Appraisal Information

This material has been appraised in line with standard GB 0247 procedures

Custodial History

Unknown

Accruals

None expected

Location of Originals

This material is original

Bibliography

No known publications using this material

Additional Information

Fonds level description compiled by Andrew Thomson, Hub Project Archivist, 18 August 2004. Biographical history compiled by Danielle West, Archive volunteer, June 2004.