Letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 DDWes/9/75
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 DDWes/9/75
      GB 135 Volume of Wesley Autograph Letters & Manuscripts, page 75.
  • Dates of Creation
      28 Jan 1779

Scope and Content

Note

  • Revd. James Creighton was a minister of the Church of Ireland, who after initial opposition to Methodism, allied himself with the movement. He eventually resigned his curacy and was appointed to City Road Chapel in London as one of the resident clergymen. In 1784 he took part in the ordinations of Thomas Coke, Richard Whatcoat, and Thomas Vasey, for the work in the United States. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism, 1974, and C. F. Crookshank, Methodism in Ireland, 1885-1888

From Margaret Johnston in Lisleen, Annadale, Ulster, to John Pritchard at the house of Mr Spencer in Northampton, re spiritual matters.

Does Pritchard remember the first Sunday that he went to church after his illness? Reference is made to Brother Milne.

Johnston, Jane [Johnston's daughter], and [Andrew] McCutchan left McCutchan's house at dawn on Christmas day to hurry home to meet Johnston's eldest son, who will be spending some time with his mother on account of his ill health. They also wished to attend a meeting which was held in Newtown Butler, County Fermanagh, the following day the sermons were delivered by [Jonathan] Herne and [William] Boothby. They spent Sunday with friends in Clones, met with [Bernard] Connelly's class and heard Boothby preach again in the evening. Afterwards a Love Feast was held 'at which two deeply convinced of sin received a sense of being pardoned.'

The people were very reluctant to let them leave the following day, so they dined with one family and had tea with another, before attending a band meeting.

[William] Boothby accompanied them to Temple the following night, and nearly thirty people came to family prayer.

[Jonathan] Herne is looking like a new man 'he has got an innocent childish look and manner. He says his soul has enjoyed more of the presence of God in one week on Clones circuit, than for five years before'. Johnston was unable to see Mrs Herne as she lodges some way out of town and anyway 'was lying in of two boys'.

Two days after their arrival they were visited by Johnston's youngest son and his wife, and they dined together the following day. Reference is made to Mr and Mrs Chambers.

What does Pritchard think of Mr and Mrs Crawford going with their daughter and nieces to a dance given by Mrs Noble, who is in their class? 'has not Sidney got among strange Christians'. Mr Bickerstaff's family were invited, but he refused them permission to attend. Johnston spoke to Mrs Crawford about it, and was told 'that she hoped God would not accuse her [Crawford] with it , as her will did not consent to it…I suppose she could calm her conscience in the same manner on any other occasion'. Were it not for Andrew McCutchan and two or three others, Johnston would wish that she had never seen County Longford.

Her health is restored.

Reference is made to [John] Wesley and Brother A.

Has Pritchard heard of John McBinney's marriage to Widow Whitely? This match surprised everyone as he has been in very poor health, 'but it is thought that he will soon have a little one to divert him. They were married privately by Revd.[James] Creighton five months before it was discovered'.

John Nielson[?] has moved away but still preaches sometimes.

Johnston recently received a letter from Robert Dale, who informs her that he and his colleague have found five hundred 'in society' on the Isle of Man, and have since added sixty more.

Poor Nancy [Anne Devlin] had the cancer cut from her breast by Dr Cromlin, and is apparently doing well [see DDWes 9/74].

Miss Hamilton went to Dublin in November, where she is lodging at [Thomas] Bible's house.

Miss Cochran is still apparently with Mr and Mrs McCloghrey.

Charles [Johnston's son] reads a few chapters from the bible to his mother each evening, and the church prayers twice a day 'you know he loves to be chaplain here'.

Reference is made to Nehemiah Price.

Note

Note

  • Revd. James Creighton was a minister of the Church of Ireland, who after initial opposition to Methodism, allied himself with the movement. He eventually resigned his curacy and was appointed to City Road Chapel in London as one of the resident clergymen. In 1784 he took part in the ordinations of Thomas Coke, Richard Whatcoat, and Thomas Vasey, for the work in the United States. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism, 1974, and C. F. Crookshank, Methodism in Ireland, 1885-1888