Letter

Scope and Content

Notes

  • Francis Wrigley (1746-1824) was born in Manchester. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1769 and exercised an active circuit ministry for fifty-five years in England, Ireland and Scotland. His conference obituary describes him as a rigid enforcer of Methodist discipline. In his personality there was 'a degree of harshness; and he retained throughout his life an abruptness of manner, which not infrequently produced...an opinion unfavourable to his courtesy: but those who knew him best, discovered in him great tenderness of affection...'. At the time of his death he was the oldest Methodist minister. Wrigley was buried at City Road chapel in London. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1819 and Minutes of Conference 1825
  • John King (1752-1822) was born at Guisborough in Yorkshire. He was converted in early life and joined the Methodist society in 1770. He became a local preacher and was instrumental in opening the work in several new places in Yorkshire. King joined the itinerancy in 1783 and exercised his circuit ministry in England until superannuation in 1811. He settled in Seven Oaks in Kent but remained active until poor health late in life forced him into a more sedentary existence. Source: Kenneth Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the stations to which they were appointed 1739-1818, Minutes of Conference 1823 and John Lenton's onlist list of Wesley's preachers (GCAH website)

From Francis Wrigley in Blackburn to Mr [John] King at the Preaching House in Ripon. He is pleased that the 'affair is settled - when misunderstandings get between stewards and absent preachers, they frequently do no good. The absent preacher is jealous[?] that his successor is in the plot. Temptations from Satan and evil surmisings get into the minds of some ... and charge preachers with things they never did, or thought of.'

Preachers do not always think or act alike. 'I often think I am a Methodist preacher; and as such have rules given me how to act. These rules every preacher, [unreadable word] every assistant in particular, is interested to see them observed. When we meet with some men, who like to follow their own wills, what wisdom, what patience, what meekness and resolution we need ! I have often found it good, when, I have known what to do, to stand still, to see see how to do it ... It is always better to follow judgement well-informed, than to be intimidated and submit ourselves and our work to our fear of consequences.'

Wrigley was at Keighley with Mr [John] Wesley and heard of that awful event - the death of that most agreeable and excellent sister and friend Mrs Dawson. Wrigley felt very sorry for Mr Dawson. He trusts that God has supported him and Miss Lapadge in their loss.

His regards should be passed to Mr Dawson, Miss Lapadge, Mr and Mrs Ogilvie and Mr Christie

Note

Notes

  • Francis Wrigley (1746-1824) was born in Manchester. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1769 and exercised an active circuit ministry for fifty-five years in England, Ireland and Scotland. His conference obituary describes him as a rigid enforcer of Methodist discipline. In his personality there was 'a degree of harshness; and he retained throughout his life an abruptness of manner, which not infrequently produced...an opinion unfavourable to his courtesy: but those who knew him best, discovered in him great tenderness of affection...'. At the time of his death he was the oldest Methodist minister. Wrigley was buried at City Road chapel in London. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1819 and Minutes of Conference 1825
  • John King (1752-1822) was born at Guisborough in Yorkshire. He was converted in early life and joined the Methodist society in 1770. He became a local preacher and was instrumental in opening the work in several new places in Yorkshire. King joined the itinerancy in 1783 and exercised his circuit ministry in England until superannuation in 1811. He settled in Seven Oaks in Kent but remained active until poor health late in life forced him into a more sedentary existence. Source: Kenneth Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the stations to which they were appointed 1739-1818, Minutes of Conference 1823 and John Lenton's onlist list of Wesley's preachers (GCAH website)