Letter

Scope and Content

From Mrs Elizabeth Wood in Birmingham to Mary Tooth in Madeley. She was very obliged for the lock of Mary Fletcher's hair and for the pamphlets.

She called this morning upon Mrs Rudge and delivered the pamphlets with Tooth's love - she asked that her love be sent back to Tooth. Wood had some conversation with Rudge about husband's death and which chapel she attended etc. She promised to come to Wood's chapel on Sunday.

Mr [Joseph] Collier has seen Mr [Henry] Moore and Moore says that he would take pleasure in looking over Mary Fletcher's manuscript [manuscript spiritual autobiography of Mary Fletcher published under Moore's editorship in 1817] and will exert all his efforts respecting it. He says that if Tooth could send him the document and allow him a little time to examine it before they meet, he would be better prepared to provide any advice that Tooth would like.

Mr and Mrs Collier send their love.

On the reverse of this letter is a reply from Mary Tooth to Henry Moore

Although she is a stranger, Tooth is very grateful for his compliance with her request for advice with regard to publishing Mary Fletcher's papers. She is enclosing with this letter, Fletcher's manuscript journals. She would be very obliged if Moore could read them over 'and observing as you read, any thing that strikes you as improper to appear before the public. The life and other writings of her's, you can at some future time peruse ...'

Notes

  • Joseph Collier (d.1842) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1795 and exercised a circuit ministry in England and Wales until superannuation due to ill health in 1837 whereupon he settled in the Bristol North circuit. Source: Minutes of Conference 1842

Note

Notes

  • Joseph Collier (d.1842) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1795 and exercised a circuit ministry in England and Wales until superannuation due to ill health in 1837 whereupon he settled in the Bristol North circuit. Source: Minutes of Conference 1842