Photograph Album 12

Scope and Content

Album of signed portrait photographs of Johnians from the 1860s and early 1900s. Also a few holiday photographs of Johnians from 1925.

Administrative / Biographical History

Theologian, mathematician, Master of St John's College. Charles Taylor was born in Westminster in 1840, the son of a tea dealer. Following his father's death, Taylor's family moved to Hampstead. Taylor was educated at St Marylebone and All Souls, London, and then at King's College School, before entering St John's College in 1858 as a sizar. In 1860 he was elected to a foundation scholarship and in 1862 graduated ninth wrangler in the mathematical tripos and with a second class in classics. In 1863 Taylor obtained a first class in the theological examination, with distinction in Hebrew, and more honours followed in 1864, when he was elected to both the Tyrwhitt and Crosse scholarships and to a Fellowship at St John's.
Taylor published a number of books and papers in the field of mathematics, mainly concerning geometry. He joined the London Mathematical Society in 1872 and served as president of the Mathematical Association in 1892.
Taylor was ordained in 1866, and in 1873 was elected to a College lecturership in theology. He was a renowned Hebrew scholar. In the 1870s Taylor was active in the revision of the College statutes, and he was also a member of the Cambridge University Commission, tasked with improving the state of the University. Upon the death of W.H. Bateson in 1881, Taylor was elected Master of St John's, receiving the degree of DD later that year. In 1887 he was made Vice-Chancellor of the University, a post he held for two years. In October 1907, Taylor married Margaret Dillon, but only ten months later he died suddenly in Nuremberg while on a foreign tour. A stained glass window was installed in St John's College Chapel in 1910, at Mrs Taylor's expense, in memory of her husband.
A keen oarsman, Taylor rowed in College boat races from 1863 to 1866. He was also fond of walking and climbing and was a member of the Alpine Club from 1873 until his death.

Benians was born in Goudhurst, Kent in 1880. His father was the headmaster of Bethany School in Goudhurst, and it was here that Benians received his schooling. He was admitted to St John's in 1899 and became a Fellow in 1906. Benians was appointed Lecturer in History in 1912, became a Tutor in 1918, and Senior Tutor in 1926. In the same year he was made University Lecturer in History, specialising in the history of the British colonies and dependencies, and the United States of America. He was Master of St John's from 1933 until his death in 1952, and served as Vice-Chancellor of the University 1939-41.

White came up to St John's as a mathematical scholar in 1912, graduating BA in 1915. In 1916 he was elected to the Isaac Newton Studentship in Astronomy and Optical Physics, a post he held for three years before being elected a Fellow of the College. He was appointed a College Lecturer in 1920 and was Director of Studies in Mathematics from 1945 to 1959. He served on the Council of the London Mathematical Society from 1923 to 1947, and was Secretary of the Cambridge Philosophical Society from 1924 to 1936, and its President from 1961 to 1963. He was appointed Librarian at St John's College in 1948, a post he held until his retirement in 1961, and served as Keeper of the College Records 1961-9.

Acquisition Information

Album belonging originally to Charles Taylor. Photographs on pages 32-6 belonging to E. A. Benians and on pages 42 belonging to F. P. White added at a later date.

Note

Theologian, mathematician, Master of St John's College. Charles Taylor was born in Westminster in 1840, the son of a tea dealer. Following his father's death, Taylor's family moved to Hampstead. Taylor was educated at St Marylebone and All Souls, London, and then at King's College School, before entering St John's College in 1858 as a sizar. In 1860 he was elected to a foundation scholarship and in 1862 graduated ninth wrangler in the mathematical tripos and with a second class in classics. In 1863 Taylor obtained a first class in the theological examination, with distinction in Hebrew, and more honours followed in 1864, when he was elected to both the Tyrwhitt and Crosse scholarships and to a Fellowship at St John's.
Taylor published a number of books and papers in the field of mathematics, mainly concerning geometry. He joined the London Mathematical Society in 1872 and served as president of the Mathematical Association in 1892.
Taylor was ordained in 1866, and in 1873 was elected to a College lecturership in theology. He was a renowned Hebrew scholar. In the 1870s Taylor was active in the revision of the College statutes, and he was also a member of the Cambridge University Commission, tasked with improving the state of the University. Upon the death of W.H. Bateson in 1881, Taylor was elected Master of St John's, receiving the degree of DD later that year. In 1887 he was made Vice-Chancellor of the University, a post he held for two years. In October 1907, Taylor married Margaret Dillon, but only ten months later he died suddenly in Nuremberg while on a foreign tour. A stained glass window was installed in St John's College Chapel in 1910, at Mrs Taylor's expense, in memory of her husband.
A keen oarsman, Taylor rowed in College boat races from 1863 to 1866. He was also fond of walking and climbing and was a member of the Alpine Club from 1873 until his death.

Benians was born in Goudhurst, Kent in 1880. His father was the headmaster of Bethany School in Goudhurst, and it was here that Benians received his schooling. He was admitted to St John's in 1899 and became a Fellow in 1906. Benians was appointed Lecturer in History in 1912, became a Tutor in 1918, and Senior Tutor in 1926. In the same year he was made University Lecturer in History, specialising in the history of the British colonies and dependencies, and the United States of America. He was Master of St John's from 1933 until his death in 1952, and served as Vice-Chancellor of the University 1939-41.

White came up to St John's as a mathematical scholar in 1912, graduating BA in 1915. In 1916 he was elected to the Isaac Newton Studentship in Astronomy and Optical Physics, a post he held for three years before being elected a Fellow of the College. He was appointed a College Lecturer in 1920 and was Director of Studies in Mathematics from 1945 to 1959. He served on the Council of the London Mathematical Society from 1923 to 1947, and was Secretary of the Cambridge Philosophical Society from 1924 to 1936, and its President from 1961 to 1963. He was appointed Librarian at St John's College in 1948, a post he held until his retirement in 1961, and served as Keeper of the College Records 1961-9.

Additional Information

Published