Charles Coulson: Cambridge lecture notes

Archive Collection

Scope and Content

Thirty-nine folders of lecture notes taken by Coulson as an undergraduate student at Cambridge University. There is an accompanying typescript note by Coulson, June 1970, regarding the notes, and a printed pamphlet, Lectures for the mathematical tripos, June 1936, 14 pages.

Box 1

1. Cecil Benjamin Allsopp, lectures on the physical properties of organic chemicals, Michaelmas 1933.

2. Francis William Aston, lectures on isotopes, Michaelmas 1931.

3. Abram Samoilovitch Besicovitch, lectures on differential equations, Michaelmas 1929.

4. Abram Samoilovitch Besicovitch, lectures on infinite series, 1929.

5. Abram Samoilovitch Besicovitch and Arthur Stanley Ramsey, lectures on complex variable, Lent and Easter, 1929.

6. Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett, lectures on light, Michaelmas 1931.

7. Patrick Maynard Stuart Blackett, lectures on the properties of matter, Lent 1932.

8. Max Born, lectures on the field theory of matter, Michaelmas 1933.

9. Subrahmanyan Chandrasekhar, lectures on astrophysics, Lent 1935.

10. Sir John Douglas Cockcroft, lectures on electrodynamics, Lent 1931 and 1932.

11. Ebenezer Cunningham, lectures on electricity, Lent and Easter 1929.

12. Ebenezer Cunningham, lectures on classical electron theory, Lent 1930 and Lent 1931.

13. Ebenezer Cunningham and Ralph Howard Fowler, lectures on mathematical physics, Michaelmas 1928 and Lent 1929.

14. William Reginald Dean, lectures on elasticity, Michaelmas and Lent 1932.

15. Paul Adrien Maurice Dirac, lectures on advanced quantum theory, Michaelmas 1932.

16. Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington, lectures on the combination of observations, Lent 1932.

17. Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington, lectures on relativity, Lent 1933.

18. Sir Arthur Stanley Eddington, lectures on relativity and the electron, Easter 1933.

19. William Leonard Edge, lectures on plane algebraic curves, Lent 1929.

Box 2

20. Ralph Howard Fowler, lectures on thermodynamics, Easter 1929.

21. Ralph Howard Fowler, lectures on statistical mechanics, Easter 1933.

22. Sir Harold Jeffreys, lectures on hydrodynamics, Michaelmas and Lent 1931.

23. Sir Harold Jeffreys, lectures on operational methods, Lent 1931.

24. John Edward Lennard-Jones, lectures on quantum theory and chemistry, Lent-Easter 1933.

25. John Edward Lennard-Jones, lectures on quantum theory and molecular structure, Michaelmas 1933.

26. Nevill Francis Mott, lectures on elementary quantum theory, 1931-1933.

27. Andrew Munro, lectures on elasticity, optics and hydrostatics, 1929.

28. (a) Leopold Alexander Pars, lectures on hydrodynamics, 1930; (b) Arthur Stanley Ramsey, lectures on waves, 1931.

29. Leopold Alexander Pars, lectures on general dynamics, Michaelmas 1933.

30. (a) Arthur Stanley Ramsey, lectures on differential calculus, Michaelmas 1928; (b) Abram Samoilovitch Besicovitch, lectures on integral calculus, Lent 1929.

31. John Ashworth Ratcliffe, lectures on electric waves, Lent 1930.

32. Ernest, 1st Baron Rutherford, lectures on the constitution of the atom, Michaelmas 1931, and of ions, Easter 1932.

33. William Marshall Smart, lectures on astronomy, undated.

34. Charles Percy, Baron Snow, lectures on molecular structure and band spectra, Easter 1933.

35. Glbert Stead, lectures on thermionics and x-rays, Lent 1932.

36. Sir Joseph John Thomson, lectures on conduction through gases, 1930.

37. Francis Puryer White, lectures on conics, Michaelmas 1928, and quadrics, Lent 1929.

38. Francis Puryer White, lectures on differential geometry, Michaelmas 1930.

39. William Edward Woodward, lectures on electric waves, Lent 1931.

Administrative / Biographical History

Charles Alfred Coulson (1910-1974), theoretical chemist, was born at Dudley on 13 December 1910. He was educated in Dudley and Bristol before entering Clifton College in 1923. He joined Trinity College, Cambridge, in 1928, where he took the mathematics tripos and Part II of the natural sciences tripos. He was awarded his Ph.D. in 1936, and in 1938 became senior lecturer in mathematics at University College, Dundee. Coulson joined the Physical Chemistry Laboratory at Oxford in 1945, and became lecturer in mathematics at University College. He took up the chair of theoretical physics at King's College, London, in 1947, and was appointed to the chair of mathematics at Oxford in 1952. In 1972 he became Oxford's first Professor of Theoretical Chemistry. Coulson died in Oxford on 7 January 1974.

Conditions Governing Access

Open for consultation by holders of a Reader's Ticket valid for the Manuscripts Reading Room.

Acquisition Information

Presented by Professor C.A. Coulson, 1970.

Other Finding Aids

None.

Archivist's Note

Description compiled by Robert Steiner, Department of Manuscripts and University Archives. The biographical history was compiled with reference to the entry on Charles Coulson in Lord Blake and C.S. Nicholls, eds, Dictionary of national biography, 1971-1980 (Oxford University Press, 1986), pp. 182-183.

Corporate Names