Parish records of York, St John, Ousebridge

Scope and Content

Includes register of christenings, 1570-1685, 1740-1932 (note this register uses the Dade registration scheme for the years 1779-1812); register of marriages, 1570-1933; register of burials, 1570-1847 (note this register uses the Dade registration scheme for the years 1777-1812, ages only 1797-1812); register of banns, 1896-1934; records concerning benefice income, including sequestration papers, 1931-1933; charity records, including notes regarding parish charities, [18th century]; churchwardens’ records, including accounts, 1585-1668, 1689-1933, and proposed demolition correspondence, 1938-1947; records of incumbent, including missions account bank book, 1923-1932, and statistical returns, 1921-1931; records concerning parish rooms and societies, including the guild for the care of altar and sanctuary rota, 1931; Vestry/Parochial Church Council records, including minutes of meetings, 1710-1921, 1926-1932, and accounts, 1928-1932; description of church bells, 1960.

Administrative / Biographical History

The church of St John, Ouse Bridge End, was first mentioned in a papal confirmation of minster properties in 1194. The parish was subject to the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of York and was annexed, along with five other churches, to St Martin Coney Street between 1331 and 1443.

A proposal was made in 1548 to unite St John’s with All Saints North Street but this was later abandoned and the parish was not otherwise affected by the consolidation of York parishes that took place following the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the sixteenth century. In 1934 when the benefice and parish were united with Holy Trinity, Micklegate.

Holy Trinity became the parish church of the expanded parish and St John’s Church was closed in 1939. It was re-opened in 1956 by the York Academic Trust as an Institute of Architectural Study, and was later sold and converted into a licensed bar.

An alteration of the parish boundaries with Acomb, Dringhouses and St Paul and the formation of St James the Deacon, Acomb Moor all took place on the 8th May 1968.

Conditions Governing Access

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute in 1967. In 1998 a description of the church bells was found at the Institute and transferred to the archive.

Note

The church of St John, Ouse Bridge End, was first mentioned in a papal confirmation of minster properties in 1194. The parish was subject to the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of York and was annexed, along with five other churches, to St Martin Coney Street between 1331 and 1443.

A proposal was made in 1548 to unite St John’s with All Saints North Street but this was later abandoned and the parish was not otherwise affected by the consolidation of York parishes that took place following the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the sixteenth century. In 1934 when the benefice and parish were united with Holy Trinity, Micklegate.

Holy Trinity became the parish church of the expanded parish and St John’s Church was closed in 1939. It was re-opened in 1956 by the York Academic Trust as an Institute of Architectural Study, and was later sold and converted into a licensed bar.

An alteration of the parish boundaries with Acomb, Dringhouses and St Paul and the formation of St James the Deacon, Acomb Moor all took place on the 8th May 1968.

Other Finding Aids

A typescript finding aid, to file level, is available for consultation in the searchroom of the Borthwick Institute.

Alternative Form Available

Registers of christenings, 1570-1932, marriages, 1570-1933, burials, 1570-1847, and banns, 1896-1900, are also available on microfilm at the Borthwick Institute (References: MF 841, 1763).

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 19.11.15

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are not expected.

Related Material

Some civil parish records for York, St John have been deposited at York Explore.

Additional Information

Published

GB 193