Correspondence of Bernard Jennings

Scope and Content

Bernard Jennings served as Secretary of the Unservile State Group, and his collection of relevant correspondence, presumably passed to George Watson, is represented here. Items will ultimately be catalogued individually; for now, a list of correspondents follows.
*
(N.B. These files representing individual correspondents are preceded in the sequence by a file containing event invitations and groups of replies from various people.)
AIREDALE, Oliver
ARMITAGE, John
ARNOLD, Ron
BEAUMONT, Timothy Wentworth
BELOFF, Max
BRITTAN, Samuel
CRANSTON, Maurice
DALE, Tom
DAVIDSON, James
DAWES, Margaret
DEIGHTON, H S
DODDS, Elliott
DÛCHENE, François
GRIMOND, Jo
HARVEY, Heather
HUTTON, Graham
JOHNSTON, Russell
MEADOWCROFT, Michael
MICKLEM, Nathaniel
MIRFIN, Derick
MOORE, Richard
RAVETZ, Jerome
ROWNTREE, B Philip
SUMERLING, B
THOMPSON, John
WADE, William Oulton, Lord Wade
WAINWRIGHT, Richard
WATSON, George
WEST, Edwin
WHITELEY, Kath
WILES, Peter
WISEMAN, Jack
WOLFERS, John

Administrative / Biographical History

George Grimes Watson was born in Brisbane, Australia, on 13 October 1927. He was educated at Brisbane Boys' College and the University of Queensland, where he graduated in 1948 with a degree in English. He secured a scholarship for a second degree and received an English degree from Trinity College, Oxford in 1950; he worked for the European Commission as an interpreter before becoming a lecturer in English at Cambridge in 1959 and a Fellow of St John's College in 1961. He remained at St John's until his death in 2013.
Watson edited 'The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature'. As well as producing wide-ranging literary and cultural criticism, he was involved in leftist politics, campaigning as a Liberal candidate in 1959 and 1979 and working as Editor for the Unservile State Group; his political writing often critiques socialism from a liberal perspective.

Note

George Grimes Watson was born in Brisbane, Australia, on 13 October 1927. He was educated at Brisbane Boys' College and the University of Queensland, where he graduated in 1948 with a degree in English. He secured a scholarship for a second degree and received an English degree from Trinity College, Oxford in 1950; he worked for the European Commission as an interpreter before becoming a lecturer in English at Cambridge in 1959 and a Fellow of St John's College in 1961. He remained at St John's until his death in 2013.
Watson edited 'The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature'. As well as producing wide-ranging literary and cultural criticism, he was involved in leftist politics, campaigning as a Liberal candidate in 1959 and 1979 and working as Editor for the Unservile State Group; his political writing often critiques socialism from a liberal perspective.

Additional Information

Published