'The English Mind'

Scope and Content

First published 1964. This subseries contains a memorandum of agreement and correspondence. Items will ultimately be catalogued individually; for now, a list follows.
*
Memorandum of agreement between George Watson and Cambridge University Press, for 'Joseph Butler', Watson's chapter contribution to the volume (which he edited with Hugh Sykes Davies).
*
CORRESPONDENCE
ANNAN, Noel
BARTON, Anne
BEER, John
BRADBROOK, Muriel
BENNETT, Joan
BRETT, Raymond L
BURBIDGE, Peter
BUTTERFIELD, Herbert
DAVIE, Donald
EMPSON, William
HODGART, Matthew
HOLLOWAY, John
HOUGH, Graham
KNIGHTS, Lionel C
LAWLOR, John
LEWIS, Clive Staples
OAKESHOTT, Michael
PHILLIPS, Ann
RATHMELL, John Christopher Abbott
SALINGAR, Leo
STRAUMANN, Heinrich
WATT, Ian
WELSFORD, Enid
WILLEY, Basil
*
Envelope labelled '"The English Mind" (CUP, 1964)'.

Administrative / Biographical History

George Grimes Watson was born in Brisbane, Australia, on 13 October 1927. He was educated at Brisbane Boys' College and the University of Queensland, where he graduated in 1948 with a degree in English. He secured a scholarship for a second degree and received an English degree from Trinity College, Oxford in 1950; he worked for the European Commission as an interpreter before becoming a lecturer in English at Cambridge in 1959 and a Fellow of St John's College in 1961. He remained at St John's until his death in 2013.
Watson edited 'The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature'. As well as producing wide-ranging literary and cultural criticism, he was involved in leftist politics, campaigning as a Liberal candidate in 1959 and 1979 and working as Editor for the Unservile State Group; his political writing often critiques socialism from a liberal perspective.

Note

George Grimes Watson was born in Brisbane, Australia, on 13 October 1927. He was educated at Brisbane Boys' College and the University of Queensland, where he graduated in 1948 with a degree in English. He secured a scholarship for a second degree and received an English degree from Trinity College, Oxford in 1950; he worked for the European Commission as an interpreter before becoming a lecturer in English at Cambridge in 1959 and a Fellow of St John's College in 1961. He remained at St John's until his death in 2013.
Watson edited 'The New Cambridge Bibliography of English Literature'. As well as producing wide-ranging literary and cultural criticism, he was involved in leftist politics, campaigning as a Liberal candidate in 1959 and 1979 and working as Editor for the Unservile State Group; his political writing often critiques socialism from a liberal perspective.

Additional Information

Published