Sir H. Bartle Frere correspondence

Administrative / Biographical History

Sir Henry Bartle Edward Frere was born on 29 March 1815 in Brecknockshire, the son of Edward Frere, an ironmaster, and his wife Mary Anne Green. Educated at Bath and then at the East India College in Haileybury, in 1834 Frere joined the Bombay civil service, rising to become private secretary to the governor of Bombay, Sir George Arthur, and Commissioner of the newly appropriated territory of Sind.
In 1857, following the outbreak of the Indian Mutiny, Frere offered valuable military support to British forces in Western India, receiving a knighthood for his efforts. In 1859 he was made a member of the Viceroy’s Council in Calcutta, supporting Lord Canning’s post Mutiny policy of crown control and reconciliation. In 1862 he was made governor of Bombay where he created new municipal institutions, introduced sanitary measures and oversaw the buildings of railways and the improvement of Bombay harbour to meet the growing demand for Indian cotton.
Frere retired from India in 1867 and returned to England where he took up a seat on the Indian Council in London. He died at Wressil Lodge, Wimbledon, on 29 May 1884.

Note

Sir Henry Bartle Edward Frere was born on 29 March 1815 in Brecknockshire, the son of Edward Frere, an ironmaster, and his wife Mary Anne Green. Educated at Bath and then at the East India College in Haileybury, in 1834 Frere joined the Bombay civil service, rising to become private secretary to the governor of Bombay, Sir George Arthur, and Commissioner of the newly appropriated territory of Sind.
In 1857, following the outbreak of the Indian Mutiny, Frere offered valuable military support to British forces in Western India, receiving a knighthood for his efforts. In 1859 he was made a member of the Viceroy’s Council in Calcutta, supporting Lord Canning’s post Mutiny policy of crown control and reconciliation. In 1862 he was made governor of Bombay where he created new municipal institutions, introduced sanitary measures and oversaw the buildings of railways and the improvement of Bombay harbour to meet the growing demand for Indian cotton.
Frere retired from India in 1867 and returned to England where he took up a seat on the Indian Council in London. He died at Wressil Lodge, Wimbledon, on 29 May 1884.

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