Raywell Sanatorium Archive

Scope and Content

Printed minutes of the East Riding and City of York Joint Sanatorium Committee, 1919-1926.

Administrative / Biographical History

Raywell Sanatorium opened on 24 August 1920. Situated in Raywell House near Cottingham in the East Riding, the house and estate had been purchased jointly by the East Riding and York in 1919 after earlier plans to buy and convert the buildings had been delayed by the First World War. Until 1937 it was managed by the East Riding and York Joint Sanatorium Committee, with York represented by the six members of York Tuberculosis Subcommittee.

The sanatorium was designed to provide accommodation for 44 adults and 20 children. The main building was to be used for administration, with patients’ accommodation in three new pavilions - a male, a female, and a hospital pavilion - as well as a children’s day room, all of which were to be erected in the grounds.

Thirty-four patients were initially admitted, two being transfers from elsewhere. A number of these first patients were discharged tuberculosis soldiers. For the first year patients resided in the main block, with the pavilions not completed until July 1921. There were 47 patients in the institution in January 1922. The total bed complement of the sanatorium was 64 out of which 21 beds were allotted to York. There was a total of 63 patients in residence in August 1922.

The sanatorium was fully used in the early 1920s and York had 20 patients at Raywell in December 1924. But York’s use of the institution declined in the late 1920s and early 1930s as cases of TB began to fall generally. There were 15 York patients at Raywell in 1927, ten in December 1934 and only seven in December 1937.

As from 1 October 1937 the Ministry of Health dissolved the East Riding and York Joint Sanatorium Committee and the sanatorium came under the complete control of the East Riding County Council. By the time Raywell had opened, York had already provided itself with another sanatorium at Fairfield Hospital.

Conditions Governing Access

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute in 1995 as part of the transfer of York Health Archives to the Institute from their temporary home at Clifton Hospital.

Note

Raywell Sanatorium opened on 24 August 1920. Situated in Raywell House near Cottingham in the East Riding, the house and estate had been purchased jointly by the East Riding and York in 1919 after earlier plans to buy and convert the buildings had been delayed by the First World War. Until 1937 it was managed by the East Riding and York Joint Sanatorium Committee, with York represented by the six members of York Tuberculosis Subcommittee.

The sanatorium was designed to provide accommodation for 44 adults and 20 children. The main building was to be used for administration, with patients’ accommodation in three new pavilions - a male, a female, and a hospital pavilion - as well as a children’s day room, all of which were to be erected in the grounds.

Thirty-four patients were initially admitted, two being transfers from elsewhere. A number of these first patients were discharged tuberculosis soldiers. For the first year patients resided in the main block, with the pavilions not completed until July 1921. There were 47 patients in the institution in January 1922. The total bed complement of the sanatorium was 64 out of which 21 beds were allotted to York. There was a total of 63 patients in residence in August 1922.

The sanatorium was fully used in the early 1920s and York had 20 patients at Raywell in December 1924. But York’s use of the institution declined in the late 1920s and early 1930s as cases of TB began to fall generally. There were 15 York patients at Raywell in 1927, ten in December 1934 and only seven in December 1937.

As from 1 October 1937 the Ministry of Health dissolved the East Riding and York Joint Sanatorium Committee and the sanatorium came under the complete control of the East Riding County Council. By the time Raywell had opened, York had already provided itself with another sanatorium at Fairfield Hospital.

Other Finding Aids

A typescript finding aid, to file level, is available for consultation in the searchroom of the Borthwick Institute.

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 27.07.15.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are not expected.

Additional Information

Published

GB 93