Parish records of Weaverthorpe

Scope and Content

Includes register of christenings, 1682-1978; register of marriages, 1682-1978; register of burials, 1682-1854 (note this register uses the Dade registration scheme for the years 1802-12, ages only); register of banns, 1831-1975; register of services, 1901-1912, 1923-1949, 1950-1965; records concerning benefice income, including glebe mortgage, 1876, and draft lease for glebe farm, 20th century; churchwardens’ records, including accounts, 1752-1896, 1927-1960, and visitors' book, 1932-1949; plan of Weaverthorpe School, 1911; Vestry/Parochial Church Council records, including minute book, 1933-1941, and accounts, 1872-1927; copies of London Gazette relating to Weaverthorpe, 1866-1867, 1870, 1874, 1924; historical notes on the church, 1960s; photographs of church, 1930s, 1960s, 1990s.

Administrative / Biographical History

There was a church at Weaverthorpe from at least the early twelfth century when it was given by the Archbishop of York to Herbert the Chamberlain. Herbert’s son, William, granted it to canons of Nostell Priory.

The advowson was reserved to Archbishop Walter de Grey in 1247 and in 1269 it was formally granted to the Dean and Chapter of York. A vicarage was ordained there in 1300. The parish remained subject to the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of York until the nineteenth century.

The parish included chapels of ease at East and West Lutton (also known by their combined name of Luttons Ambo), although both villages separated from Weaverthorpe to become part of Helperthorpe parish in January 1856.

The parish church, which is dedicated to St Andrew, dates to the early twelfth century and may have been built on the site of an earlier Saxon structure. It was restored by architect George Edmund Street in 1872, at the expense of Sir Tatton Sykes of Sledmere Hall. A vicarage house was built in 1867.

Today the parish is part of the benefice of Weaverthorpe with Helperthorpe and Luttons Ambo, which also includes Kirby Grindalythe and Wharram le Street.

Conditions Governing Access

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute in 1966. Further additions were made to the archive in 1979 and 1999.

Note

There was a church at Weaverthorpe from at least the early twelfth century when it was given by the Archbishop of York to Herbert the Chamberlain. Herbert’s son, William, granted it to canons of Nostell Priory.

The advowson was reserved to Archbishop Walter de Grey in 1247 and in 1269 it was formally granted to the Dean and Chapter of York. A vicarage was ordained there in 1300. The parish remained subject to the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of York until the nineteenth century.

The parish included chapels of ease at East and West Lutton (also known by their combined name of Luttons Ambo), although both villages separated from Weaverthorpe to become part of Helperthorpe parish in January 1856.

The parish church, which is dedicated to St Andrew, dates to the early twelfth century and may have been built on the site of an earlier Saxon structure. It was restored by architect George Edmund Street in 1872, at the expense of Sir Tatton Sykes of Sledmere Hall. A vicarage house was built in 1867.

Today the parish is part of the benefice of Weaverthorpe with Helperthorpe and Luttons Ambo, which also includes Kirby Grindalythe and Wharram le Street.

Other Finding Aids

A typescript finding aid, to file level, is available for consultation in the searchroom of the Borthwick Institute. This includes all material received up to and including 1999.

Alternative Form Available

Selected records, including registers of christenings, 1682-1900, marriages, 1682-1900, burials, 1682-1854, and banns, 1831-1900, and churchwardens' accounts, 1686-1896, are also available on microfilm at the Borthwick Institute (References: MF 806, 1777-1778).

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 18.03.16.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are expected.

Additional Information

Published

GB 193