Parish records of Skipwith

Scope and Content

Includes register of christenings, 1670-1999; register of marriages, 1710-2002; register of burials, 1654-1669, 1670-1880; register of banns, 1813-1963; register of services, 1903-2001; records concerning benefice income, including glebe deed and map, 1855; charity records, including accounts and correspondence concerning Joseph Nelson Educational Foundation, 1956-2003; churchwardens’ records, including accounts, 1731-1910, briefs, 1804-1811, and fabric papers, 1876-1983; overseers’ records, including accounts, 1747-1837, and overseers’ book for the township of North Duffield, 1806-1838; school records, including managers' minutes of meetings, 1903-1956, correspondence, 1955-1957, and annual reports, 1954-1955; Vestry/Parochial Church Council records, including minutes of meetings, 1923-1972, 1996-2011, accounts, 1923-1973, 2009-2011, enclosure award amendment, 1905, award of common rights and access to Skipwith common, 1904, correspondence, 1974, and census returns, 1801, 1811, 1821; notes concerning the history of the church, 1977-2004; volume containing surveyors’ accounts and assessments and names of overseers, constables and surveyors for the township of North Duffield, 1746-1894.

Administrative / Biographical History

The existence of a church at Skipwith was recorded in Domesday in the eleventh century. It was granted by William the Conqueror to the Bishop of Durham and then by him to the Priory of Durham in the 1120s. In 1280 it formed the endowment of the new Prebend of Skipwith within the Priory’s collegiate church at Howden, subject to the Priory’s peculiar jurisdiction. A vicarage was ordained there the same year.

At the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the sixteenth century the Priory and its monastic community were dissolved and replaced by a Dean and Chapter. The parish of Skipwith consequently became subject the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Durham and the advowson of the church passed to the Archbishop of York and then to the Crown.

The parish church, which is dedicated to St Helen, dates to before the Norman Conquest. The tower was begun in the eleventh century and added to in the fifteenth. The main body of the church was extended in the twelfth and sixteenth centuries, and the church was extensively restored in 1876-1877 by the architect John Loughborough Pearson. The oldest examples of stained glass in the church date to the fourteenth century. A new rectory house was built in 1865, funded by Queen Anne’s Bounty.

The parish also includes the township of North Duffield.

Today the parish is known as Skipwith and North Duffield and it is part of the benefice of Bubwith with Skipwith, which also includes Aughton.

Conditions Governing Access

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute sometime prior to 1975. Further additions were made to the archive in 1975, 1980, 1983, 1999, 2005 and 2012.

Note

The existence of a church at Skipwith was recorded in Domesday in the eleventh century. It was granted by William the Conqueror to the Bishop of Durham and then by him to the Priory of Durham in the 1120s. In 1280 it formed the endowment of the new Prebend of Skipwith within the Priory’s collegiate church at Howden, subject to the Priory’s peculiar jurisdiction. A vicarage was ordained there the same year.

At the Dissolution of the Monasteries in the sixteenth century the Priory and its monastic community were dissolved and replaced by a Dean and Chapter. The parish of Skipwith consequently became subject the peculiar jurisdiction of the Dean and Chapter of Durham and the advowson of the church passed to the Archbishop of York and then to the Crown.

The parish church, which is dedicated to St Helen, dates to before the Norman Conquest. The tower was begun in the eleventh century and added to in the fifteenth. The main body of the church was extended in the twelfth and sixteenth centuries, and the church was extensively restored in 1876-1877 by the architect John Loughborough Pearson. The oldest examples of stained glass in the church date to the fourteenth century. A new rectory house was built in 1865, funded by Queen Anne’s Bounty.

The parish also includes the township of North Duffield.

Today the parish is known as Skipwith and North Duffield and it is part of the benefice of Bubwith with Skipwith, which also includes Aughton.

Other Finding Aids

A typescript finding aid, to file level, is available for consultation in the searchroom of the Borthwick Institute. This includes all material received up to and including 2005.

Alternative Form Available

Selected records, including registers of christenings, 1670-1853, marriages, 1670-1900, burials, 1670-1880, and banns, 1813-1900, churchwardens' accounts, 1731-1900, overseers' accounts, 1747-1837, and population accounts, 1801-1811, are also available on microfilm at the Borthwick Institute (References: MF 782, 1757, 1776).

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 10.03.16.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are expected.

Additional Information

Published

GB 193