letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 DDPr 2/8
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 DDPr 2/8
      GB 133 Leather Volume V - Letters of Methodist Preachers, p.8
  • Dates of Creation
      17 Nov 1760
  • Physical Description
      1 item

Scope and Content

Notes

  • Matthew Moore was a merchant of Tullamore in Ireland. He is referred to in a letter of 1760 as providing hospitality for Methodist preachers. John Wesley was entertained by Moore on 25 April 1787 and preached in Moore's parlor. Source: C. H. Crookshank, History of Methodism in Ireland (1885), Volume 1, p.427 and John Wesley's Journal 25 April 1787
  • Thomas Brisco (d.1798) entered the itinerancy in 1751 and served for more than forty years in a number of English and Irish stations. Source: C. H. Crookshank, History of Methodism in Ireland (1885), Volume 1, p.152 and Kenneth B. Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the Stations to which they were appointed 1739- 1818
  • Robert Roberts (d.1800) was a native of Upton near Chester. He was converted by Thomas Brisco and became a Methodist preacher in 1759. He served for over forty years in a number of English and Irish stations. Source: C. H. Crookshank, History of Methodism in Ireland (1885), Volume 1, p.152 and Kenneth B. Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the Stations to which they were appointed 1739- 1818.
  • Thomas Tobias was a Welshman who entered the itinerancy in either 1750 (Crookshank) or 1756 (Pawson's list of preachers 1795). He served in Ireland from 1760 and is described by Crookshank as 'a man of cheerful spirit, of deep piety and great zeal for the glory of God'. He then disappears from the record and is recorded by Pawson as having left the itinerancy. Source: C. H. Crookshank, History of Methodism in Ireland (1885), Volume 1, p.149 and John Pawson, Chronological Catalogue of all the Travelling Preachers... (1795).

From Thomas Brisco in Athlone, Ireland to Charles Wesley. Brisco and [Robert] Roberts arrived safely in Ireland about a fortnight after leaving Bristol, having enjoyed a very pleasant passage lasting about twenty-three hours. Brothers [Thomas] Tobias, [Laurence] Coughlan and [William] Thompson came after them and had a very trying time, coming as near to being lost at sea as is possible and still survive. They were caught in a storm which lasted all night. The sailors did not think that the ship could last, so they lowered the sails, lashed the helm and abandoned the upper deck. The captain asked the preachers to pray, for in all probability they were all about to die. Some on board the ship who had behaved in a very wicked manner the day before, were now desirous of joining in the prayers. The preachers called upon God in turn and Brother Tobias exhorted the crew and passengers for three hours, saying that they should have no fear of death and that he rejoiced at the thought of going to paradise. Tobias also said that he was afraid for the crew and passengers, as many of them were unprepared. All this time the ship was being driven before the wind, and it looked as if it would be wrecked off the coast of the Isle of Man or the coast of Northern Ireland. Towards morning, one of the sailors went onto the deck and saw a light. The captain also went up expecting that they would be driven on rocks close to the shore, and discovered to his surprise that they were entering Dublin Bay as easily as if there was no wind and the crew were at their stations. So great was his wonder, that he cried out that God must have been at the helm.

Brothers Roberts, Tobias and himself are in one round. It takes six weeks to travel round it, riding a total of two hundred and forty two miles. Brisco feels that the Lord has blessed his work since he arrived here. The second sermon that he preached gave comfort to many, and one person was clearly justified. He has also been gratified to discover that many who were 'convinced' during his last visit to Ireland are still strong in the faith.

God's work in this round has been sadly neglected, but is now being revived. The congregations are greatly increased. Brisco hopes that Charles will remember him in his prayers, especially as there are times when he is greatly tried.

He trusts that Charles is now in better health, than when he saw him last in Bristol.

In a postscript, he asks that his regards and those of Mr Roberts be passed on to Mr Hooper, who entertained them during their stay in Bristol. Letters should be sent to Brisco, care of Matthew Moores [Moore], Merchant of Tullamore.

Note

Notes

  • Matthew Moore was a merchant of Tullamore in Ireland. He is referred to in a letter of 1760 as providing hospitality for Methodist preachers. John Wesley was entertained by Moore on 25 April 1787 and preached in Moore's parlor. Source: C. H. Crookshank, History of Methodism in Ireland (1885), Volume 1, p.427 and John Wesley's Journal 25 April 1787
  • Thomas Brisco (d.1798) entered the itinerancy in 1751 and served for more than forty years in a number of English and Irish stations. Source: C. H. Crookshank, History of Methodism in Ireland (1885), Volume 1, p.152 and Kenneth B. Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the Stations to which they were appointed 1739- 1818
  • Robert Roberts (d.1800) was a native of Upton near Chester. He was converted by Thomas Brisco and became a Methodist preacher in 1759. He served for over forty years in a number of English and Irish stations. Source: C. H. Crookshank, History of Methodism in Ireland (1885), Volume 1, p.152 and Kenneth B. Garlick, An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers and Missionaries, and the Stations to which they were appointed 1739- 1818.
  • Thomas Tobias was a Welshman who entered the itinerancy in either 1750 (Crookshank) or 1756 (Pawson's list of preachers 1795). He served in Ireland from 1760 and is described by Crookshank as 'a man of cheerful spirit, of deep piety and great zeal for the glory of God'. He then disappears from the record and is recorded by Pawson as having left the itinerancy. Source: C. H. Crookshank, History of Methodism in Ireland (1885), Volume 1, p.149 and John Pawson, Chronological Catalogue of all the Travelling Preachers... (1795).