letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 DDPr 1/42
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 DDPr 1/42
      GB 133 Leather Vol.VI - Letters Chiefly Addressed to the Rev. C Wesley, p.42
  • Dates of Creation
      6 Aug 1773
  • Physical Description
      1 item

Scope and Content

Note

  • Edward Collinson was a prosperous tinman and ironmonger of Lombard Street in the city of London. Closely associated with London Methodism for many years, he often provided hospitality for visiting preachers. Source: George John Stevenson, City Road Chapel, London, and its Associations, Historical, Biographical, and Memorial (1872), pp.497-498

From John Horton in London. [John Wesley] has informed Horton that [Mark Davis] has promised to return the mare [to Charles]. Mr Snig will deliver her. What can be done about Davis? Horton is afraid that the Methodists are stuck with him. Davis complains that Horton has turned very shy with him - how can he be otherwise when he believes Davis to be guilty of the charges which are brought against him, despite [John Wesley's] favourable opinion.

John Wesley is drawing up a plan to settle all the preaching houses in one general trust. If this can be done, it may help to keep the preachers in some sort of order. Otherwise, Horton is afraid that many of them will shake off the authority of [John Wesley] completely. If John Wesley himself is unable to keep control of 'these headstrong gentlemen', what will happen after he dies? When Horton passed on Charles's message that he hoped to see John Wesley for dinner on the 11th, he replied that he expected to be with Charles on monday evening by the 'fly' [a fast coach]

Horton saw Brothers [Edward] Collinson and Butcher yesterday. They feel that it would be best to advertise the house [Probably Chesterfield Street, London or less likely Charles Street, Bristol] for sale or rent, as Charles views it as a burden. At the same time, Horton must add that the Society 'will not be pleasd wth a proposal of saving £60 a year on condition OF LOSING your labours among them'.

Horton's wife is still in Islington and is hopefully benefitting from the clean air and water. She proposes to move to a better lodging at 6 Well's Row in a week or ten days, and would be pleased if Charles's sisters [Martha Hall and his sisters-in-law Rebecca Gwynne and Elizabeth Waller] could give her the pleasure of their company, although she appreciates that it is a long way for them to travel.

In a postscript reference is made to Mr Ley and his [?son] Billy.

Shorthand annotations by Charles Wesley

Note

Note

  • Edward Collinson was a prosperous tinman and ironmonger of Lombard Street in the city of London. Closely associated with London Methodism for many years, he often provided hospitality for visiting preachers. Source: George John Stevenson, City Road Chapel, London, and its Associations, Historical, Biographical, and Memorial (1872), pp.497-498