letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 DDPr 2/4
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 DDPr 2/4
      GB 133 Leather Volume V - Letters of Methodist Preachers, p.4
  • Dates of Creation
      15 Sep 1775
  • Physical Description
      1 item

Scope and Content

Note

  • Mrs McDonald (d.1788) was a servant at the Foundery for forty years. The preacher Peter Jaco in her funeral sermon, described McDonald as 'weak in her mental powers', but upright in character and conduct. Source: Obituary by Peter Jaco in The Arminian Magazine 1788, p.409

From John Atlay in London to Charles Wesley in Bristol. He has been hopeful of receiving a letter from Wesley for some days, but without result. Atlay would have written himself before now, but since returning to London he has been sick for four out of the five days and in such pain as he has never experienced before. He would have been glad to have found refuge in death if the Lord had seen fit. The source of his malady is the 'stone' and it will no doubt return to plague him. He is nevertheless under conviction that the Lord will support him and has never felt such a complete confidence before. Spiritual matters are discussed.

He has not seen John since returning to London. He is in Scotland and will be there for several weeks yet. Atlay will deliver Charles Wesley's message to him when he returns.

Their 'family' [Methodist brethren] are well, although Mrs McDonald is lame again in the same leg as last year. Mr Baines is well liked in London and Atlay hopes that he will prove useful.

Atlay's wife joins in sending best wishes

[Annotated by Charles Wesley - 'Atlay happy in the stone...'.]

Note

Note

  • Mrs McDonald (d.1788) was a servant at the Foundery for forty years. The preacher Peter Jaco in her funeral sermon, described McDonald as 'weak in her mental powers', but upright in character and conduct. Source: Obituary by Peter Jaco in The Arminian Magazine 1788, p.409