Papers of Frederick Penny

Archive Collection

Scope and Content

Lecture notes; Published papers; Obituaries; Biographical information

Summary of records

Administrative / Biographical History

Frederick Penny was born in London and studied chemistry at the Royal Institution under Michael Faraday. He was appointed to the Chair of Chemistry at Anderson's University in 1839, after a recommendation from Thomas Graham, and held the post until his death in 1869. His students included those attending Anderson's Medical School. In addition to his teaching at the University, Penny built up a lucrative private practice as an analytical chemist, and was involved in testing the quality of the water from Loch Katrine as a potential source for a new, clean water supply for the City of Glasgow. He gave expert evidence in criminal trials, specialising in poisoning cases such as the trial of Dr Pritchard for the murder of his wife and mother in law. His last years were embittered by the University's proposal to found a Chair in Technical Chemistry endowed by James Young, which Penny and his friend and colleague Dr James Adams vehemently opposed.

Conditions Governing Access

Open

Other Finding Aids

Catalogued online to item level

Archivist's Note

Archivist's note: Description prepared by Margaret Harrison.Rules or Conventions: Description based on Scottish Archive Network guidelines, based on ISAD(G): General International Standard Archival Description, International Council on Archives (2nd edition, 2000). and Rules for the construction of personal, place and corporate names, National Council on Archives (1997)Date of descriptions: June 2008

Related Material

GB 249 OP/4/9, 48 Photographs of Frederick Penny

GB 249 ODA/5 Correspondence relating to the Young Chair of Technical Chemistry