Parish records of Escrick

Scope and Content

Includes register of christenings, 1617-1687, 1719-1982 (note this register uses the Dade registration scheme for the years 1777-1782); register of marriages, 1617-1687, 1719-1992; register of burials, 1617-1687, 1719-1991 (note this register uses the Dade registration scheme for the years 1777-1812, ages only); register of banns, 1892-1986; register of services, 1857-1983; register of confirmations, 1963-1992; records concerning benefice income, including accounts, 1943-1946, tithe papers, 1781, 1802, 1862, 1883, 1886, glebe farm labour accounts, 1848-1849, glebe farm papers, 1909-1922, 1939, papers, c.1960s, and glebe papers, 1975-1977; charity records, including accounts, 1890-1895, deeds, 1648, 1891, and papers, 1860, 1862, 1902; churchwardens’ records, including accounts, 1662-1797, 1805-1895, 1912-1913, 1915-1916, rates, 1662-1670, restoration papers, 1780-1781, 1802, fabric papers, 1902-1903, 1923-1925, 1935-1980, drawings and plans (mostly F. C. Penrose) for church, rectory and cottages, c.1848-1924, church plate papers, 1911-1970s, churchyard papers, 1954-1977, and visitors' book, 1973-1981; constables’ records, including accounts, 1660-1797, rates, 1660-1670, army and royal aids assessments, 1654-1691, papers, 1669-1679, and manor court pains, 1753-1774; records of incumbents, including parsonage house papers, 1889, 1900, 1951, statistical returns, 1899-1900, 1903-1905, 1908-1909, benefice papers, 1979-1981, rectory papers, c.1848, incumbents' papers, 1976, and church membership returns, 1977-1979; overseers’ records, including accounts, 1662-1835, rates, 1662-1770, and apprenticeship costs, 1670-1671; Vestry/Parochial Church Council records, including minutes of meetings, 1895-1970, accounts, 1951-1973, 1978, deeds of covenant, 1963-1967, inhabitants excused hearth tax, 1670s, and parish magazines, 1974-2001 (with some gaps).

Administrative / Biographical History

The earliest reference to a church at Escrick was in 1252. The advowson of the rectory there followed the descent of the manor of Escrick. In the thirteenth century it was held by the Lascelles family, before passing to the Knyvetts and the Thompsons. By the end of the nineteenth century it was held by the Lawley family of Wenlock, who had inherited the manor and rectory through marriage to Jane, heiress to Beilby Thompson.

Little is known of the medieval parish church of St Helen. In 1460 Guy Roucliff bequeathed money and lead for its tower and it was repaired in 1663, and again in 1759 when a new gallery was erected at the west end. In 1781 the site, which was situated to the west of Escrick Hall, was granted to Beilby Thompson on the condition that he built a new church elsewhere. A new parish church and churchyard were consecrated in 1783, but the church was replaced in 1857 by the present building, erected by the Lawley family. The church was damaged by fire in 1923 but was restored and reopened in 1925. A new rectory had also been built in 1763 and replaced in 1848 by a larger house on the same site.

The parish includes the township of Deighton. There is evidence of a chapel of ease there in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. By 1914 there was a mission room at Deighton Grove, which remained in use until 1959.

Today Escrick parish is part of the united benefice of Escrick and Stillingfleet with Naburn.

Conditions Governing Access

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute in 1965 by the incumbent. Further additions were made to the archive in 1973, 1975, 1978, 1980, 1981, 1987, 1988, 1992, 1993, 1994 and 2002.

Note

The earliest reference to a church at Escrick was in 1252. The advowson of the rectory there followed the descent of the manor of Escrick. In the thirteenth century it was held by the Lascelles family, before passing to the Knyvetts and the Thompsons. By the end of the nineteenth century it was held by the Lawley family of Wenlock, who had inherited the manor and rectory through marriage to Jane, heiress to Beilby Thompson.

Little is known of the medieval parish church of St Helen. In 1460 Guy Roucliff bequeathed money and lead for its tower and it was repaired in 1663, and again in 1759 when a new gallery was erected at the west end. In 1781 the site, which was situated to the west of Escrick Hall, was granted to Beilby Thompson on the condition that he built a new church elsewhere. A new parish church and churchyard were consecrated in 1783, but the church was replaced in 1857 by the present building, erected by the Lawley family. The church was damaged by fire in 1923 but was restored and reopened in 1925. A new rectory had also been built in 1763 and replaced in 1848 by a larger house on the same site.

The parish includes the township of Deighton. There is evidence of a chapel of ease there in the thirteenth and fourteenth centuries. By 1914 there was a mission room at Deighton Grove, which remained in use until 1959.

Today Escrick parish is part of the united benefice of Escrick and Stillingfleet with Naburn.

Other Finding Aids

A typescript finding aid, to file level, is available for consultation in the searchroom of the Borthwick Institute. This includes all material received up to and including 2002.

Alternative Form Available

Selected records, including registers of christenings, marriages, and burials, 1617-1900, and banns, 1892-1900, terriers, 1764, 1777, 1865, account books, 1654-1894, pains book, 1753-1774, and glebe farm account book, 1848-1849, are also available on microfilm at the Borthwick Institute (References: MF 681, 1753, 1766, 1772-1773).

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 08.02.16.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are expected.

Additional Information

Published

GB 193