Parish records of Knapton

Scope and Content

Includes register of christenings, 1834-1976 (note these registers also contain baptisms for Yedingham 1985-1993); register of marriages, 1760-1835, 1837-1970; register of banns, 1823-1965; register of services, 1949-1971; records concerning benefice income, including correspondence and papers, 1904-1912; churchwardens’ records, including accounts, 1796-1904, fabric papers, 1913, 1923-1956, and churchyard papers, 1912; records of incumbents, including correspondence, 1912, 1915, and statistical returns, 1936-1937; school records, including agreement to let schoolhouse, 1903.

Administrative / Biographical History

The earliest church at Knapton is believed to date from the Norman period, although the present building was erected in 1870-1872 by John Gibson & Son of Malton. Traces of the earlier structure survive however in the Norman corbels next to the porch, the fourteenth century treble bell and the Royal Coat of Arms of King Charles II retained by the architects.

The church, which is dedicated to St Edmund, is situated in the parkland of Knapton Hall and was a chapelry within the parish of Wintringham. It was augmented through Queen Anne’s Bounty in 1742, 1770, 1789 and 1810, and through a Parliamentary Grant in 1828 and 1832. In the nineteenth century the advowson was held by the Tindall family, who were lords of the manor of Knapton.

The church became redundant in the 1970s and was appropriated for community services on the 24th Oct 1978. Today it is open for occasional services and is part of the united benefice of Buckrose Carrs, together with Thorpe Bassett, Rillington, Scampston, Wintringham, Yedingham, East and West Heslerton, and Sherburn.

Conditions Governing Access

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute in 1971 by the incumbent. Further additions were made to the archive in 1975, 1982 and 1993.

Note

The earliest church at Knapton is believed to date from the Norman period, although the present building was erected in 1870-1872 by John Gibson & Son of Malton. Traces of the earlier structure survive however in the Norman corbels next to the porch, the fourteenth century treble bell and the Royal Coat of Arms of King Charles II retained by the architects.

The church, which is dedicated to St Edmund, is situated in the parkland of Knapton Hall and was a chapelry within the parish of Wintringham. It was augmented through Queen Anne’s Bounty in 1742, 1770, 1789 and 1810, and through a Parliamentary Grant in 1828 and 1832. In the nineteenth century the advowson was held by the Tindall family, who were lords of the manor of Knapton.

The church became redundant in the 1970s and was appropriated for community services on the 24th Oct 1978. Today it is open for occasional services and is part of the united benefice of Buckrose Carrs, together with Thorpe Bassett, Rillington, Scampston, Wintringham, Yedingham, East and West Heslerton, and Sherburn.

Other Finding Aids

A typescript finding aid, to file level, is available for consultation in the searchroom of the Borthwick Institute. This includes all material received up to and including 1993.

Alternative Form Available

Registers of christenings, 1834-1856, marriages, 1760-1885, and banns, 1823-1900, are also available on microfilm at the Borthwick Institute (References: MF 719, 1762).

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 24.02.16.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are not expected.

Additional Information

Published

GB 193