Letter

Scope and Content

From Bristol, to Samuel Lloyd in Devonshire Square, London, thanking him for his letter, which arrived with the razors. Charles may call in London for the wig before the winter, although he does not care for the place, and were it not for his friends living there, he would not care if he never saw the city again.

Their friends are very happy with the Wesleys. Mrs D. 'came partly on account of her soul to prepare for baptism…she is a wonderful creature; & designed I believe for some great good… the poor Colonel has wrote me a letter, as contrary to his former sayings as light to darkness'.

If Mr James can let Charles have £20 for the printer, Charles will give him a note authorising Lloyd to reimburse the money.

Sarah is gaining in strength all the time, after the birth of their daughter Martha Maria.

Some parts of Charles's last letters to Lloyd were not answered fully.

L. H. [Lady Huntingdon] 'thinks the time of my redemption draws nigh. I am heartily tired of the yoke, & if once I get it off my neck, shall never call any man master. That base £100 shall never buy my liberty. I seem very easy if it be paid me no longer'.

Lloyd should bear in mind that they are to meet at the end of August.

Note

  • Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, was the most important lay convert of the period. An early member of the Fetter Lane Society, she devoted herself entirely to the work of the revival after the death of her husband in 1746. From 1760 she sponsored the building of several chapels, which eventually formed the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion. She also founded a college at Trevecka for the training of preachers. After corresponding with the Welsh Evangelist Howell Harris, she adopted Calvinist views. This posed some problems for her relationship with the Wesley brothers, which had been very close. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974), and Wesley family papers deposited at the Methodist Archives and Research Centre.

Note

Note

  • Selina Hastings, Countess of Huntingdon, was the most important lay convert of the period. An early member of the Fetter Lane Society, she devoted herself entirely to the work of the revival after the death of her husband in 1746. From 1760 she sponsored the building of several chapels, which eventually formed the Countess of Huntingdon's Connexion. She also founded a college at Trevecka for the training of preachers. After corresponding with the Welsh Evangelist Howell Harris, she adopted Calvinist views. This posed some problems for her relationship with the Wesley brothers, which had been very close. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974), and Wesley family papers deposited at the Methodist Archives and Research Centre.