Letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 DDCW/7/21
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 DDCW/7/21
      GB 133 Folio entitled Letters of the Rev. C. Wesley, 21
  • Dates of Creation
      [5 Jan ?1760]

Scope and Content

From London. Sarah's letter has just arrived to arouse his concern for their son. He hopes that by the time this reply reaches her the boy will be much better. Spiritual matters are discussed.

Every illness that Charles junior has 'will be in yr apprehension the small-pox'. Charles does not actually think that will strike before the boy has finished teething.

His love should be given to Mrs Grinfield, [Anne] Vigor, [?Mrs] James, [?Mrs] Stonehouse and his duty to Lady Austen.

They began the new year very comfortably. At the chapel and the Foundery his text was 'Account that long suffering of our Lord is salvation'. His mouth was opened wonderfully and the subsequent breaking of bread affected many. Charles then visited Mr J-Anson and gave the sacrament to his family. ?Sir Thomas's love for Charles is immense, almost as vehement in fact as that of poor [John] Hutchinson. After dinner he rode to the Foundery.

He recently met Lord Huntingdon [Francis Hastings] and his sister Lady Selina at the home of their mother [Countess of Huntingdon]. His Lordship could not resist using impious language. Charles was able to stop him but without convincing him of his error. Lady Selina graciously asked after Sarah, despite the fact that she is perhaps worse than her brother 'who wd not rather follow Charley and Sally to their graves, than see them SECT children'.

Sarah should write to Mrs Dewal without fail concerning Sarah's worry about the security. Dewal will certainly try to get the house mortgaged to Sarah.

Last night they kept a triumphant watch-night at the Foundery, parting soon after ten.

This morning their 'little church' met at Paddington and God was present indeed.

He dined at Lady Piers's and in the absence of his horse walked home along the New Road. Charles has recovered his strength wonderfully. He is able to walk three miles with less weariness than travelling one would have just four months ago. He is convinced that riding every day was the main factor in his recovery.

Sarah should send the earthquake hymns with one hundred on the threatened invasion. Francis Gilbert can bring them to London.

J W returns to London on Monday '& puts an end to our holidays'. Charles is going to print the hymns for children.

Yesterday he dined with [William] Romaine, who was very cordial. His wife would like to make Sarah's acquaintance.

In a postscript reference is made to Lady [Mary Manners] fears that her children will live to be bad people.

Notes

  • Publication Record: Quoted by Thomas Jackson, The Journal of the Rev. Charles Wesley (1849), Vol.2, pp.257-8 and by Dr Frank Baker, Charles Wesley - As Revealed by his Letters (1948), p.108.
  • William Romaine (1714-95) was ordained into the Anglican ministry in 1738. He was at first a supporter of the Arminian Methodism of John Wesley but later sided with George Whitefield to became a leading Anglican exponent of Calvinism. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974).

Note

Notes

  • Publication Record: Quoted by Thomas Jackson, The Journal of the Rev. Charles Wesley (1849), Vol.2, pp.257-8 and by Dr Frank Baker, Charles Wesley - As Revealed by his Letters (1948), p.108.
  • William Romaine (1714-95) was ordained into the Anglican ministry in 1738. He was at first a supporter of the Arminian Methodism of John Wesley but later sided with George Whitefield to became a leading Anglican exponent of Calvinism. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974).