Letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 DDCW/5/30
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 DDCW/5/30
      GB 133 Folio entitled Letters of the Revd C. Wesley, page 30
  • Dates of Creation
      1 Mar [1749]

Scope and Content

From Bristol to [Sarah Gwynne junior]. The rain held off for two hours after they parted, but then it poured down for the rest of the day. Yesterday was fair. They took horse at 5 am and reached [Newnham] passage in Gloucestershire in about three hours. They waited until 10.30 am [to board the ferry] and reached the English side of the Severn estuary before noon. They were in Bristol before two in the afternoon.

[Sarah] Perrin gave him a warm welcome, and an encouraging account of the Bristol Society. G. Wh [G W] had confirmed the news from Wales [about Charles 's engagement], and the Society had reacted exactly as they ought - 'not six gossips are to be found among a thousand people; & those my brother had shamed & silenced by telling the Society yt THE WHOLE AFFAIR WAS HIS DOING & COMMENDING their behavr on this occasion'. Charles has received Sarah's letter from Oxford.

The first words that he read in the bible upon his arrival in Bristol were very apt - 'be still & know yt I am God'.

He spent half an hour with his brother at Kingswood School, which 'is now very much like a college. 21 boarders there are, & a dozen students, his [J W's] pupils & sons in the gospel. I believe he is now laying the foundation of many generations'.

He reached [Anne Vigor's] house at five in the afternoon, attended by Charles and Edward [Perronet]. She was disappointed that he was not accompanied by Sarah. She desired that her love and that of her sisters be passed on.

Charles preached at the New Room 'to many listening joyful souls'. He could not help but wish that the Welsh [Methodists] were more like their English counterparts for 'there wd then he fewer stumbling blocks in ye way of the sincere'. The first words that he read at the New room were also encouraging - 'And there was great joy in that city'.

They are expecting an answer from [Henry] Thornton in the next post. He read John the passage from Mr Hope's letter - 'he smiled without surprize at the HONEST ATTORNEY'.

He composed the following poem 'O God my refuge in distress' while on the road.

Note

  • Publication Record: 'O God my refuge in distress' was transcribed by S T Kimbrough, and Oliver Beckerlegge in The Unpublished Poetry of Charles Wesley (1988), Volume 1, pp.243-244.

Note

Note

  • Publication Record: 'O God my refuge in distress' was transcribed by S T Kimbrough, and Oliver Beckerlegge in The Unpublished Poetry of Charles Wesley (1988), Volume 1, pp.243-244.