Letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 DDCW/7/78
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 DDCW/7/78
      GB 133 Folio entitled Letters of the Rev. C. Wesley, 78
  • Dates of Creation
      15 Jun [?1770]

Scope and Content

From Charles Wesley to his wife Sarah. From [London]. He had intended to send by this post, an account of Mrs Davis's 'fiery trial', which she was wonderfully brought through on Tuesday, but he has been unable to speak to the principal witness Betty Duchesne. He saw their 'happy friend' [Mrs Davis] this morning together with [William] Perronet, 'who does not apprehend any great danger of her recovering'.

As usual he encloses the following account of Tuesday night; For above an hour they enjoyed the presence of God. Once more Charles prayed for Sarah 'that you may KNOW his pardoning love'. They had close fellowship with all the members.

Yesterday he had breakfast with Mrs Blackwell and her husband [Ebenezer] whose behaviour could not be faulted.

Mrs Dewal will probably call on Sarah in Charles Street in the first week in July. Her doctor has ordered her to visit Bristol as soon as possible. Charles junior will lend her his room.

He dined at Mrs Chambers's with Mr and Mrs Hunt, Mr and Mrs Bowls and [George] Downing etc. They sang, prayed and talked 'not without comfort'. Charles was very tired by the time the gathering broke up, as he finds that 'a crowd even of religious people dissipates me, unless we spend ye whole time in worship'. He feels that he will come home to Sarah and never leave except to preach and visit the sick.

He has heard nothing from her Ladyship [the Countess of Huntingdon] since the Conference and does not wish to. His love of retirement increases with his work load. 'I shd not be sorry if all the religious world cast me off'.

Sarah should be sure to mention dear Mrs Stonehouse in her letters to Mrs Parkinson and to 'pray for our happy meeting on tomorrow fortnight'.

He has preached at the Foundery every morning this week 'with much inlargement'.

His love should be passed on to Nurse, Sarah and all his other friends.

[Thomas] Maxfield must not preach in the Horsefair [the New Room].

Note

  • Relations between the Countess of Huntingdon and John Wesley were severely strained in 1770 by a controversy regarding Calvinism which reached its climax at the Methodist Conference of that year. Source: General Methodist historical.

Note

Note

  • Relations between the Countess of Huntingdon and John Wesley were severely strained in 1770 by a controversy regarding Calvinism which reached its climax at the Methodist Conference of that year. Source: General Methodist historical.