Parish records of Londesborough

Scope and Content

Includes register of christenings, 1580-1633, 1653-1941 (1653-1930 as a transcript); register of marriages, 1580-1633, 1653-1811, 1813-1980; register of burials, 1580-1633, 1653-1992; register of banns, 1823-1918; register of services, 1903-1970; records concerning benefice income, including glebe correspondence, 1968-1975, table of fees, 1943, and benefice income papers, 1958; charity records, including accounts, 1930-1946, and bank book for Knowlton's Charity, 1914-1946; churchwardens’ records, including accounts, 1768-1789, fabric papers, 1916-1972, and plan of addition to churchyard, 1897; constables’ records, including cavalry and navy accounts, 1797, and accounts, 1767-1857; records of incumbents, including letter book of R. Godwin, 1865-9, benefice and incumbents' papers, 1952-1974, parsonage house papers, including dilapidations papers, 1883-1986, and service papers, 1951; overseers’ accounts, 1769-1802; records concerning parish rooms and societies, including Entertainment Committee minutes of meetings, 1923-192, Entertainment Committee accounts, 1923-1933, and papers regarding 'Yorkshire Choral Competition', 1906-1910; school records, including managers' minutes of meetings, 1927-1944, accounts, 1902-1915, correspondence, 1915, and cash book, 1892-1902; surveyors’ records, including accounts, 1793-1803, and bylawmen's accounts, 1805-1819; Vestry/Parochial Church Council records, including sale map of Londesborough estates, 1921, minutes of meetings, 1920-1932, accounts, 1970-1972, wayleave agreement, 1968, insurance papers, c.1930-1952, and electoral papers, 1932-1967.

Administrative / Biographical History

There was a church at Londesborough from at least the early twelfth century when Herbert de Chamberlain granted it to his son, William, who was Archbishop of York between 1141 and 1147. Parts of the present church are believed to date to c.1200, although some features, such an Anglo-Danish cross above the South doorway, may have belonged to an earlier structure.
The church, which is dedicated to All Saints, was in the patronage of the Lords Fitzherbert until the fourteenth century, when it passed to the Bromfletes and then, through marriage, to the Cliffords, Earls of Cumberland, and then to the Boyles, Earls of Burlington. By the early nineteenth century the estate and the patronage were held by the Dukes of Devonshire. It was later sold to the Conynghams, Barons Londesborough.
The church tower was added in the fourteenth century and raised in the fifteenth. The church underwent further reconstruction in the seventeenth century, with the addition of the south porch and a 1679 restoration by Lord Burlington. It was restored again in 1873 and then again in 1885 by the architect Temple Moore, who added the new east window and rood screen. New choir stalls were added in 1905 and the tower was re-leaded and the parapet and pinnacles rebuilt in 2003.
Today the church is part of the united benefice of Londesborough Wold, together with Hayton, Burnby and Shiptonthorpe.

Access Information

Records are open to the public, subject to the overriding provisions of relevant legislation, including data protection laws. 24 hours' notice is required to access photographic material.

Acquisition Information

The archive was deposited at the Borthwick Institute in 1967 by the incumbent. Further additions were made to the archive in 1981, 1988, 1990 and 1993.

Note

There was a church at Londesborough from at least the early twelfth century when Herbert de Chamberlain granted it to his son, William, who was Archbishop of York between 1141 and 1147. Parts of the present church are believed to date to c.1200, although some features, such an Anglo-Danish cross above the South doorway, may have belonged to an earlier structure.
The church, which is dedicated to All Saints, was in the patronage of the Lords Fitzherbert until the fourteenth century, when it passed to the Bromfletes and then, through marriage, to the Cliffords, Earls of Cumberland, and then to the Boyles, Earls of Burlington. By the early nineteenth century the estate and the patronage were held by the Dukes of Devonshire. It was later sold to the Conynghams, Barons Londesborough.
The church tower was added in the fourteenth century and raised in the fifteenth. The church underwent further reconstruction in the seventeenth century, with the addition of the south porch and a 1679 restoration by Lord Burlington. It was restored again in 1873 and then again in 1885 by the architect Temple Moore, who added the new east window and rood screen. New choir stalls were added in 1905 and the tower was re-leaded and the parapet and pinnacles rebuilt in 2003.
Today the church is part of the united benefice of Londesborough Wold, together with Hayton, Burnby and Shiptonthorpe.

Other Finding Aids

A typescript finding aid, to file level, is available for consultation in the searchroom of the Borthwick Institute. This includes all material received up to and including 1993.

Alternative Form Available

Registers of christenings, 1580-1885, marriages, 1580-1885, burials, 1580-1992, and banns, 1823-1900, are also available on microfilm at the Borthwick Institute (References: MF 723, 883, 1762).

Archivist's Note

Created by S. A. Shearn, 24.02.16.

Conditions Governing Use

A reprographics service is available to researchers subject to the access restrictions outlined above. Copying will not be undertaken if there is any risk of damage to the document. Copies are supplied in accordance with the Borthwick Institute for Archives' terms and conditions for the supply of copies, and under provisions of any relevant copyright legislation. Permission to reproduce images of documents in the custody of the Borthwick Institute must be sought.

Accruals

Further accruals are expected.

Additional Information

Published

GB 193