Notes for autobiographical account

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 106 7KGG/1/3
  • Dates of Creation
      c.1912-c.1913
  • Physical Description
      1 folder

Scope and Content

Manuscript notes and drafts of Gliddon's account of her experiences in Holloway, in ink and pencil. The papers comprise:

* Notes entitled 'People', with a list of her fellow prisoners and Holloway staff, with brief notes about individuals, including Myra Sadd Brown, Mrs Gough, Mrs Marshall, Miss G Sheppard, Mrs Swan, Father McLelland (prison Chaplain), Miss Jane Lomax, Daphne Dorian, Mrs Taylor, Dr Louisa Garrett Anderson, Miss Kate Evans, Miss Murphy, Miss Jane Murphy, Mrs Mills, Miss Selkirk, Miss Barrowman, Mrs Beedham and Miss Haig.

* Notes of facts she needs to find out, questions to be answered.

* Four small sheets, scrawled over in pencil and much corrected, titled 'Hunger strike' [possibly written in Holloway].

* Two versions of a preface, written in 1913, which discusses the experience of being a prisoner and the effect of a prison sentence in general terms. One is in note form, the other a continuous narrative. It starts:

'The present diary is supposed to be written by the prisoner at the close of each day. It is really written from minute notes made at the time on odd pieces of paper. These notes were as cheerful as possible so that by making them I might keep myself cheerful, as depression is too awful a guest to entertain in the small space of a cell ... The experience of one prisoner is the experience of all. Of course every mind receives different impressions from the same circumstance because human beings are so unalike one another.'

* Seven numbered pages, headed 'Chapter II', starting:

'I am a prisoner. But I only feel a little stunned and I know I dare not think of hyacinth ['hyacinth' crossed through, 'bluebell' substituted in pencil] woods in the twilight and of the spring flowers I shall miss'.

* Six numbered pages, much corrected and crossed through, starting 'When I first came I could not read at all'.

* Six numbered pages headed 'On Coming Back to the World' - thoughts on being released from prison.

* Four pages in ink about Louisa Gay, a Croydon WSPU member, who was sent to Holloway for eight months.

* Four pages of notes, in pencil, relating to her prison experiences.

* One page, in pencil, fragment of a longer document, with thoughts and quotations related to suffragettes' experiences.

Physical Characteristics and/or Technical Requirements

Fragile - Please handle with care