TSB Scotland collection

Archive Collection

Scope and Content

The TSB Scotland collection comprises records of 66 Scottish savings banks from the early 19th century up to the early 1980s (TSB/1-72, 75-76) and also records of TSB Scotland from 1983 to 1986 (TSB/74).

Most of the sub-collections include central management records such as minutes of boards and committees. Some also include branch records, including customer ledgers and declarations.

The largest sub-collection is that of the Savings Bank of Glasgow (TSB/63), which accounts for almost 50% of the total records. It is particularly rich and varied, and includes an extensive set of branch records, penny bank records, and a colourful selection of early advertising materials.

A full listing of the sub-collections is given below. Please note that dates shown are covering dates of records held for that particular savings bank and not the dates of the bank itself. Approximate linear metreage is also provided to give an indication of the size of the individual sub-collections:

  • TSB/1: Aberdeen Savings Bank, 1822-1983 (9.52 linear metres)
  • TSB/3: Elgin Savings Bank, 1815-1982 (from 1931 part of Aberdeen Savings Bank) (2.92 linear metres)
  • TSB/4: Ellon and District Savings Bank, 1839-1967 (from 1926 part of Aberdeen Savings Bank) (0.55 linear metres)
  • TSB/5: Forres Savings Bank, 1861-1968 (from 1927 part of Aberdeen Savings Bank) (0.25 linear metres)
  • TSB/6: Grantown-on-Spey Savings Bank, 1846-1982 (Strathspey Savings Bank to 1898; from 1934 part of Aberdeen Savings Bank) (0.3 linear metres)
  • TSB/7: Insch Savings Bank, 1838-1971 (Insch and Upper Garioch Savings Bank to 1847; from 1929 part of Aberdeen Savings Bank) (0.82 linear metres)
  • TSB/9: Inverness Savings Bank, 1839-1974 (Savings Bank of the Town and County of Inverness to 1891) (3.57 linear metres)
  • TSB/10: Inverurie and Garioch Savings Bank, 1837-1984 (from 1926 part of Aberdeen Savings Bank) (0.4 linear metres)
  • TSB/11: Kingussie Savings Bank, 1890-1966 (0.52 linear metres)
  • TSB/12: Kintore Savings Bank, 1871-1942 (from 1926 part of the Aberdeen Savings Bank) (0.03 linear metres)
  • TSB/14: Nairn Savings Bank, 1840-1982 (from 1942 part of the Aberdeen Savings Bank) (1.23 linear metres)
  • TSB/15: New Deer Savings Bank , 1847-1982 (from 1927 part of the Aberdeen Savings Bank) (0.2 linear metres)
  • TSB/16: Peterhead Savings Bank, 1825-1956 (1.75 linear metres)
  • TSB/17: Stonehaven Savings Bank, 1815-1982 (from 1926 part of the Aberdeen Savings Bank) (0.25 linear metres)
  • TSB/19: Thurso Savings Bank, 1842-1979 (from 1928 part of the Aberdeen Savings Bank) (0.15 linear metres)
  • TSB/20: Wick Savings Bank, 1840-1983 (from 1840-1894 the Caithness-shire Savings Bank; from 1929 part of the Aberdeen Savings Bank) (0.15 linear metres)
  • TSB/21: Castle Douglas Savings Bank, 1840-1971 (1.16 linear metres)
  • TSB/22: Coldstream Savings Bank, 1841-1967 (from 1948 part of the Selkirkshire Savings Bank) (0.6 linear metres)
  • TSB/23: Cowdenbeath and Lochgelly Savings Bank, 1896-1958 (from 1920 part of the Dunfermline and District Savings Bank) (1.16 linear metres)
  • TSB/24: Dalkeith Savings Bank, 1839-1969 (0.45 linear metres)
  • TSB/25: Dumfries Savings Bank, 1815-1977 (Dumfries Parish Bank to 1821; Dumfries Trustee Savings Bank 1976-1977) (2.86 linear metres)
  • TSB/26: Dunfermline Savings Bank, 1837-1979 (from 1920 Dunfermline and District Savings Bank; from 1975 part of the Trustee Savings Bank of South of Scotland) (8.26 linear metres)
  • TSB/27: Edinburgh Savings Bank, 1815-1983 (from 1975 Trustee Savings Bank of South of Scotland) (19.01 linear metres)
  • TSB/28: Ettrick Forest Savings Bank, 1839-1961 (from 1920 also part of the Selkirkshire Savings Bank; from 1949 the Border Counties Trustee Savings Bank) (0.83 linear metres)
  • TSB/29: Galashiels Savings Bank, 1858-1983 (from 1920 also part of the Selkirkshire Savings Bank; from 1949 the Border Counties Trustee Savings Bank; from 1974 part of Edinburgh Savings Bank) (0.66 linear metres)
  • TSB/30: Hawick Savings Bank, 1887-1975 (in 1971 renamed South of Scotland Trustee Savings Bank) (4.33 linear metres)
  • TSB/31: Innerleithen and Traquair Savings Bank, 1905-1948 (0.17 linear metres)
  • TSB/32: Jedburgh Savings Bank, 1815-1967 (Jedburgh District Savings Bank to 1836) (0.55 linear metres)
  • TSB/33: Kelso Savings Bank, 1849-1975 (from 1949 part of the Border Counties Trustee Savings Bank) (2.01 linear metres)
  • TSB/36: Newhaven Savings Bank, 1860-1873 (0.18 linear metres)
  • TSB/37: Thornhill Savings Bank, 1846-1961 (0.93 linear metres)
  • TSB/38: Arbroath Savings Bank, 1815-1976 (0.8 linear metres)
  • TSB/39: Bathgate Savings Bank, 1921-1927 (0.08 linear metres)
  • TSB 40: Brechin Savings Bank, 1839-1952 (from 1929, part of the Dundee Savings Bank) (3.73 linear metres)
  • TSB/42: Cupar-Fife Savings Bank, 1836-1977 (Fifeshire Savings Bank from 1837-1892; from 1975 part of the Trustee Savings Bank of Tayside and Central Scotland) (2.19 linear metres)
  • TSB/43: Dundee Savings Bank, 1815-1986 (Dundee Parish Bank to [1819]; from 1975 the Trustee Savings Bank of Tayside and Central Scotland; from 1983 part of Trustee Savings Bank Scotland) (5.39 linear metres)
  • TSB/44: Fettercairn Savings Bank, 1864-1925 (0.05 linear metres)
  • TSB/45: Falkirk and Counties Savings Bank, 1845-1977 (Falkirk Savings Bank from 1845-1926; from 1975 part of the Trustee Savings Bank of Tayside and Central Scotland) (2.34 linear metres)
  • TSB/46: Forfar Savings Bank, 1852-1954 (from 1938 part of the Dundee Savings Bank) (0.15 linear metres)
  • TSB/47: Grangemouth Savings Bank, 1911-1969 (from 1916 also part of the Stirling District and County Savings Bank (0.2 linear metres)
  • TSB/48: Kinross-shire Savings Bank, 1893 (0.05 linear metres)
  • TSB/49: Kirkcaldy Savings Bank, 1846-1977 (from 1924 Kirkcaldy and District Savings Bank and from 1941, Kirkcaldy and District Trustee Savings Bank; from 1975 part of the Trustee Savings Bank of Tayside and Central Scotland) (4.11 linear metres)
  • TSB/51: Laurencekirk Savings Bank, 1912-1976 (0.5 linear metres)
  • TSB/52: Montrose Savings Bank, 1840-1979 (from 1949 Montrose Trustee Savings Bank; from 1975 part of the Trustee Savings Bank of Tayside and Central Scotland) (4.68 linear metres)
  • TSB/53: Newburgh Savings Bank, 1914-1975 (0.05 linear metres)
  • TSB/54: Perth Savings Bank, 1815-1983 (from 1975 part of the Trustee Savings Bank of Tayside and Central Scotland) (4.88 linear metres)
  • TSB/55: St Andrews Savings Bank, 1846-1948 (from 1930 part of the Dundee Savings Bank) (2.46 linear metres)
  • TSB/56: Stirling Savings Bank, 1841-1975 (from 1916 part of the Stirling District and County Savings Bank) (0.55 linear metres)
  • TSB/57: Alexandria (Vale of Leven) Savings Bank, 1864-1978 (0.2 linear metres)
  • TSB/58: Ayr Trustee Savings Bank, 1891-1955 (from 1933 part of the Savings Bank of Glasgow) (0.4 linear metres)
  • TSB/59: Bute Savings Bank, 1842-1976 (1.2 linear metres)
  • TSB/60: Campbeltown Savings Bank, 1854-1976 (2.34 linear metres)
  • TSB/61: Carluke Savings Bank, 1857-1961 (Carluke Parish Bank to 1859; from 1930 part of the Savings Bank of Glasgow) (1.76 linear metres)
  • TSB/:62 Dunoon Savings Bank, 1897-1979 (from 1931 part of the Savings Bank of Glasgow; from 1975 part of the West of Scotland Trustee Savings Bank) (2.34 linear metres)
  • TSB/63: Savings Bank of Glasgow, 1836-1983(from 1975 West of Scotland Trustee Savings Bank) (107.84 linear metres)(
  • TSB/64: Greenock Provident Bank, 1815-1976 (2.54 linear metres)
  • TSB/65: Hamilton Savings Bank, 1905-1930 (0.2 linear metres)
  • TSB/66: Helensburgh Savings Bank, 1875-1968 (from 1943 part of the Savings Bank of Glasgow) (2.17 linear metres)
  • TSB/67: Kilmarnock Savings Bank, 1907-1975 (from 1937 part of the Savings Bank of Glasgow) (0.45 linear metres)
  • TSB/68: Kirkintilloch Savings Bank, 1838-1972 (from 1960 part of the Savings Bank of Glasgow) (0.45 linear metres)
  • TSB/69: Lennoxtown (Campsie) Savings Bank, 1894-1953 (from 1938 part of the Savings Bank of Glasgow) (0.45 linear metres)
  • TSB/70: Motherwell Savings Bank, 1895-1967 (from 1929 part of the Savings Bank of Glasgow) (1.35 linear metres)
  • TSB/71: Paisley Savings Bank, 1815-1978 (Paisley Provident Bank to 1838) (6.7 linear metres)
  • TSB/72: Sanquhar District Savings Bank, 1848-1961 (Sanquhar Parish Bank to 1868) (0.6 linear metres)
  • TSB/74: TSB Scotland, 1983-1986 (0.3 linear metres)
  • TSB/75: Barry & Panbridge United Savings Bank (Carnoustie), 1930 (0.2 linear metres)
  • TSB/76: Savings Bank of Glenmuike (Ballater), 1821-1979 (from 1943 part of the Aberdeen Savings Bank) (0.06 linear metres)

Administrative / Biographical History

In 1810, the Reverend Henry Duncan founded the world's first self-supporting savings bank, in the village of Ruthwell in Dumfriesshire, Scotland. It was the beginning of a new kind of savings movement that was soon to spread across the whole of the UK. By 1818, 465 savings banks had been established the length and breadth of the country.

Unlike commercial banks, savings banks did not lend money to businesses or issue banknotes. Their main purpose was to encourage the less well off to save small sums of money, so that they could become more self sufficient, particularly in times of unemployment or other hardship. The main customers of the savings banks were domestic and farm servants, artisans, small traders and labourers. Unlike commercial banks, they also attracted large numbers of women and children.

The early savings banks were largely unregulated. They tended to be small, independent organisations, administered by voluntary managers or trustees – hence the origin of the phrase 'Trustee Savings Bank'. The trustees were usually well-to-do individuals from the local community.

The savings bank movement in England was given a huge boost in 1817, with the passing of the Savings Bank (England) Act. Drafted by the MP George Rose, a strong supporter of the savings bank movement, the act specified that deposits received by savings banks in England and Wales should be paid into an account at the Bank of England, and that customers should be paid interest on their deposits. It thus offered savings bank customers a much greater degree of security.

In Scotland however, savings banks were initially regulated by the 1819 Savings Bank (Scotland) Act, which was far less prescriptive. Its main provision was that Scottish savings banks could obtain legal status by registering their rules with the Justice of the Quarter Sessions. Unlike in England and Wales, Scottish savings banks were also allowed to deposit customers' money with joint stock banks. It wasn't until 1835, that the provisions of the English act were extended to Scotland.

In 1847 an off-shoot movement was established - the penny savings banks. Ordinary savings banks required customers to make a minimum deposit of one shilling, which was a considerable sum for the less well off. The penny banks, as the name suggests, only required an initial deposit of one penny. When a depositor had accumulated £1 with the penny savings bank, an account would be opened with the parent savings bank. The first penny bank in the UK was established by James Scott of the Greenock Provident Savings Bank in Scotland. The idea quickly caught on, and penny banks were soon being established at schools, mechanics institutes and social clubs up and down the country.

Despite its initial success, the savings bank movement faced an increasing number of challenges over the remainder of the nineteenth century. Competition from friendly societies and Post Office Savings Banks led to many closures. There were also a number of scandals, in which savings bank officials were found to have embezzled customers' money. These rocked public confidence in the savings bank movement.

The savings banks responded in a number of ways. In 1887, the Trustee Savings Banks Association was founded 'to watch over and protect the interests of the savings bank depositors, and to provide… advice and co-operation in matters of a general character [to] savings banks or their depositors'. It was led initially by William Meikle of the Savings Bank of Glasgow, one of the largest savings banks in the UK. The Association grew in importance and by the late 1920s was registered as a limited company.

The savings banks also started to diversify and change their focus away from simply saving as a form of self help, to saving for a purpose, e.g. for the purchase of household goods or holidays. The savings bank movement also played a key role in mobilising personal savings for the war effort during the First and Second World Wars.

More radical changes were seen in the 1960s. Current accounts and cheque books were offered to depositors for the first time in 1965. Life insurance policies and the TSB Unit Trust were launched in 1968.

In the wake of these developments and the growing complexity of the savings bank movement, a government committee was set up in 1970, chaired by Sir Terry Page. It was tasked with reviewing the legal and financial framework of the trustee savings banks.

The Page Committee issued its final report in 1973. It recommended that the remaining 73 trustee savings banks should be reorganised into 20 (later 16) regional banks under a holding company, and that the resultant organisations should offer a wider range of services to personal and corporate customers. The structural changes came into force in 1975 with the Trustee Savings Banks Act. In Scotland this resulted in the formation of four regional savings banks: West of Scotland TSB; TSB South of Scotland; TSB Central and Tayside Scotland; and the Aberdeen Savings Bank.

However, attempts to diversify into the retail bank markets largely failed, and within a decade further reorganisations were announced. In 1983, the 16 regional TSB banks were merged into four: TSB England and Wales; TSB Scotland; TSB Northern Ireland and TSB Channel Islands. The following year, the government introduced a new Trustee Savings Bank bill which advocated that the savings banks be incorporated under the Companies Act of 1985 and become a public limited company. In 1986, the TSB was floated on the stock exchange and the TSB Group plc came into being. In Scotland, TSB Scotland became TSB Scotland plc (from 1989, TSB Scotland Bank plc), and a new head office was opened at Henry Duncan House on George Street in Edinburgh.

In 1995, the TSB Group merged with Lloyds Bank to form Lloyds TSB Group plc. A separate Scottish subsidiary was maintained however, Lloyds TSB Scotland plc.

Arrangement

The TSB Scotland collection is arranged as follows:

  • TSB/1: Aberdeen Savings Bank
  • TSB/3: Elgin Savings Bank
  • TSB/4: Ellon and District Savings Bank
  • TSB/5: Forres Savings Bank
  • TSB/6: Grantown-on-Spey Savings Bank
  • TSB/7: Insch Savings Bank
  • TSB/9: Inverness Savings Bank
  • TSB/10: Inverurie and Garioch Savings Bank
  • TSB/11: Kingussie Savings Bank
  • TSB/12: Kintore Savings Bank
  • TSB/14: Nairn Savings Bank
  • TSB/15: New Deer Savings Bank
  • TSB/16: Peterhead Savings Bank
  • TSB/17: Stonehaven Savings Bank
  • TSB/19: Thurso Savings Bank
  • TSB/20: Wick Savings Bank
  • TSB/21: Castle Douglas Savings Bank
  • TSB/22: Coldstream Savings Bank
  • TSB/23: Cowdenbeath and Lochgelly Savings Bank
  • TSB/24: Dalkeith Savings Bank
  • TSB/25: Dumfries Savings Bank
  • TSB/26: Dunfermline Savings Bank
  • TSB/27: Edinburgh Savings Bank
  • TSB/28: Ettrick Forest Savings Bank
  • TSB/29: Galashiels Savings Bank
  • TSB/30: Hawick Savings Bank
  • TSB/31: Innerleithen and Traquair Savings Bank
  • TSB/32: Jedburgh Savings Bank
  • TSB/33: Kelso Savings Bank
  • TSB/36: Newhaven Savings Bank
  • TSB/37: Thornhill Savings Bank
  • TSB/38: Arbroath Savings Bank
  • TSB/39: Bathgate Savings Bank
  • TSB/40: Brechin Savings Bank
  • TSB/42: Cupar-Fife Savings Bank
  • TSB/43: Dundee Savings Bank
  • TSB/44: Fettercairn Savings Bank
  • TSB/45: Falkirk and Counties Savings Bank
  • TSB/46: Forfar Savings Bank
  • TSB/47: Grangemouth Savings Bank
  • TSB/48: Kinross-shire Savings Bank
  • TSB/49: Kirkcaldy Savings Bank
  • TSB/51: Laurencekirk Savings Bank
  • TSB/52: Montrose Savings Bank
  • TSB/53: Newburgh Savings Bank
  • TSB/54: Perth Savings Bank
  • TSB/55: St Andrews Savings Bank
  • TSB/56: Stirling Savings Bank
  • TSB/57: Alexandria (Vale of Leven) Savings Bank
  • TSB/58: Ayr Trustee Savings Bank
  • TSB/59: Bute Savings Bank
  • TSB/60: Campbeltown Savings Bank
  • TSB/61: Carluke Savings Bank
  • TSB/62: Dunoon Savings Bank
  • TSB/63: Savings Bank of Glasgow
  • TSB/64: Greenock Provident Bank
  • TSB/65: Hamilton Savings Bank
  • TSB/66: Helensburgh Savings Bank
  • TSB/67: Kilmarnock Savings Bank
  • TSB/68: Kirkintilloch Savings Bank
  • TSB/69: Lennoxtown (Campsie) Savings Bank
  • TSB/70: Motherwell Savings Bank
  • TSB/71: Paisley Savings Bank
  • TSB/72: Sanquhar District Savings Bank
  • TSB/74: TSB Scotland
  • TSB/75: Barry & Panbridge United Savings Bank (Carnoustie)
  • TSB/76: Savings Bank of Glenmuike (Ballater)

Please note that the following numbers were unassigned: TSB/2, TSB/8, TSB/13, TSB/18, TSB/34, TSB/35, TSB/41, TSB/50.

Conditions Governing Access

Access is by appointment only, and at the discretion of the Archivist. Closure periods apply to some records less than 100 years old. Please e-mail archives@lloydsbanking.com for further information.

Other Finding Aids

Item level catalogues are available for each of the TSB Scotland sub collections listed above. Please e-mail archives@lloydsbanking.com for further details.

Conditions Governing Use

Copying of material is permitted at the discretion of Lloyds Banking Group Archives.

Bibliography

  • H Oliver Horne, A History of Savings Banks (Oxford University Press, 1947)
  • Michael Moss and Anthony Slaven, From Ledger Book to Laser Beam: a history of the TSB in Scotland from 1810-1990 (TSB Bank Scotland plc, 1992)
  • Michael Moss and Iain Russell, An Invaluable Treasure: a history of the TSB (Weidenfield and Nicolson, London, 1994)

Corporate Names