letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 PLP 3/24/18
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 PLP 3/24/18
  • Dates of Creation
      30 Apr1815
  • Physical Description
      1 item

Scope and Content

List of unsold books returned by Atmore to London.

Note

  • Thomas Hall (1788-1847) was converted by Revd. J. S. Pipe in 1806.He immediately began preaching in the local area and in 1811 candidated for the ministry. Heexercised an active circuit ministry for thirty-six years until his death which occurred after ashort illness while stationed in the Thirsk circuit of Yorkshire. Source:Hill’s Arrangement 1841 andMinutes of Conference 1847
  • Daniel Jackson (1789-1858) was born in Stockport, the son of theMethodist preacher of the same name. He was converted in early life and entered the ministry in1812. His active circuit work was spent in England until superannuation in 1843. His retirement wasspent in Malton, Yorkshire. Jackson suffered from poor health for some time before his death onAugust 22 1858. Source:Hill’s Arrangement1858 and Minutes of the Conference 1858
  • Isaac Bradnock (1774-1833) was converted at the age of twenty-threeby the preaching of Samuel Bradburn. He was appointed as a missionary to the West Indies in 1801 andworked there for six years. Upon his return to England he laboured as a circuit minister until hisdeath, which occurred while he was stationed in the Manningtree Circuit. Source: Minutes of Conference 1834
  • Richard Elliott (1768-1813) was born in Ashover near Derbishire.Raised in the Church of England, he started to attend Methodist worship in 1784 and was convertedthree years later. Elliott began to preach locally and discussed with John Wesley in the summer of1790 the possibility of becoming an itinerant. He was accepted by the Bristol Conference of thatyear. Elliott served until 1803 when he left the active ministry to enter trade as a druggist inHuddersfield. He continued to be a local preacher and in 1809 re-entered the itinerancy. He died offever on July 7 1813. Source: Arminian Magazine1796, 571-577 andMinutes of Conference 1813
  • Robert Miller (1763-1829) was converted in 1783 and started topreach locally soon after. He entered the itinerancy in 1788 and worked in English circuits untilsuperannuation through ill health in 1824. He retired to Darlington where he died on July 10 1829.Source:Hill’s Arrangement 1827 andMinutes of Conference 1829
  • James Ridall (d.1823) entered the itinerancy in 1785 and labouredin the North of England until superannuation in 1815. He retired to New Mills near Stockport wherehe died after a short but severe illness. Ridall was described in his Conference obituary as a‘man of genuine and deep piety...His abilities as a preacher were not great; yet on account ofhis unaffected lowliness of mind, his uniform devotedness to God...he was always esteemed by thepeople among whom he worked’. Source: Minutes ofConference 1823 andAn Alphabetical Arrangement ofWesleyan Methodist Preachers...1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick
  • William Toase (1782-1863) was born at Kilton near Guisborough inLincolnshire. He was converted at the age of fifteen and entered the ministry in 1804. Fluent inFrench, Toase was appointed to the Channel Islands in 1807 and he subsequently became the firstmissionary to the French prisoners of war in the hulks in the River Medway. In 1836 he was appointedto Boulogne and then to Paris where he remained in charge of the French work from 1837 untilsuperannuation in 1848. Toase spent his retirement in the Channel Islands. He died suddenly onSeptember 20 1863 just hours after preaching his final sermon. Source:Hill’s Arrangement 1858 andMinutes of Conference 1864

Note

Note

  • Thomas Hall (1788-1847) was converted by Revd. J. S. Pipe in 1806.He immediately began preaching in the local area and in 1811 candidated for the ministry. Heexercised an active circuit ministry for thirty-six years until his death which occurred after ashort illness while stationed in the Thirsk circuit of Yorkshire. Source:Hill’s Arrangement 1841 andMinutes of Conference 1847
  • Daniel Jackson (1789-1858) was born in Stockport, the son of theMethodist preacher of the same name. He was converted in early life and entered the ministry in1812. His active circuit work was spent in England until superannuation in 1843. His retirement wasspent in Malton, Yorkshire. Jackson suffered from poor health for some time before his death onAugust 22 1858. Source:Hill’s Arrangement1858 and Minutes of the Conference 1858
  • Isaac Bradnock (1774-1833) was converted at the age of twenty-threeby the preaching of Samuel Bradburn. He was appointed as a missionary to the West Indies in 1801 andworked there for six years. Upon his return to England he laboured as a circuit minister until hisdeath, which occurred while he was stationed in the Manningtree Circuit. Source: Minutes of Conference 1834
  • Richard Elliott (1768-1813) was born in Ashover near Derbishire.Raised in the Church of England, he started to attend Methodist worship in 1784 and was convertedthree years later. Elliott began to preach locally and discussed with John Wesley in the summer of1790 the possibility of becoming an itinerant. He was accepted by the Bristol Conference of thatyear. Elliott served until 1803 when he left the active ministry to enter trade as a druggist inHuddersfield. He continued to be a local preacher and in 1809 re-entered the itinerancy. He died offever on July 7 1813. Source: Arminian Magazine1796, 571-577 andMinutes of Conference 1813
  • Robert Miller (1763-1829) was converted in 1783 and started topreach locally soon after. He entered the itinerancy in 1788 and worked in English circuits untilsuperannuation through ill health in 1824. He retired to Darlington where he died on July 10 1829.Source:Hill’s Arrangement 1827 andMinutes of Conference 1829
  • James Ridall (d.1823) entered the itinerancy in 1785 and labouredin the North of England until superannuation in 1815. He retired to New Mills near Stockport wherehe died after a short but severe illness. Ridall was described in his Conference obituary as a‘man of genuine and deep piety...His abilities as a preacher were not great; yet on account ofhis unaffected lowliness of mind, his uniform devotedness to God...he was always esteemed by thepeople among whom he worked’. Source: Minutes ofConference 1823 andAn Alphabetical Arrangement ofWesleyan Methodist Preachers...1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick
  • William Toase (1782-1863) was born at Kilton near Guisborough inLincolnshire. He was converted at the age of fifteen and entered the ministry in 1804. Fluent inFrench, Toase was appointed to the Channel Islands in 1807 and he subsequently became the firstmissionary to the French prisoners of war in the hulks in the River Medway. In 1836 he was appointedto Boulogne and then to Paris where he remained in charge of the French work from 1837 untilsuperannuation in 1848. Toase spent his retirement in the Channel Islands. He died suddenly onSeptember 20 1863 just hours after preaching his final sermon. Source:Hill’s Arrangement 1858 andMinutes of Conference 1864