letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 PLP 4/69/8
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 PLP 4/69/8
  • Dates of Creation
      4 Oct1808
  • Physical Description
      1 item

Scope and Content

From Stockport to Jabez Bunting in West Street, Sheffield. Bunting’s letter arrivedyesterday. Barber was very grateful for the information it contained, although Barber is verysurprised by [Henry] Longden’s conduct.

He does not remember how long it is since Mrs Jolly left Sheffield and went to Chapel Town[Chapeltown near Leeds?], but he thinks it was the spring after Barber was stationed in Sheffield.She went there with a view to running a school and was occupied in that for some time. However itdid not meet her expectation and she gave it up. He does not think that he has spoken to her morethan once since she moved. Mr L. [Longden?] called upon Barber and said that the school did not payits way and that he believed that she was in great want and what could be done for her.Barber’s response that he feared nothing more could be done for her in Sheffield than hadalready been done and that perhaps the best option would be for her to go to her friends inDerbyshire. Longden said that he could help her ‘and added there was a mangle[?][used forwashing clothes] in the neighbourhood that might be bought cheap’ at a price of six guineas.Barber pointed out that the reason the school had not worked out was because of her dirtiness andwould the people go to the mangle [used for washing clothes] any more than send their children toher school? Longden thought that they would and how might the mangle be paid for? Barber repliedthat it could only be done by raising money [from the Methodists]. Longden asked if Barber wouldassist and he replied that he had no objection although he doubted how much could be done as he hadtried to raise money for Jolly before and that it would probably be more proper to beginatThorricliff. Accordingly, Barber spoke to some of the Methodists there some time beforeConference. They told him that they understood that the mangle would be of little use to Jolly asshe had become some kind of `peddlar'[?] and was not much at home. They did however promise toconsider the matter. Barber was subsequently told that they had given Longden £1.11.6. A few daysbefore Barber left Sheffield, Longden called on him to settle the account for some books but did notmention that he felt that Barber had broken a promise or that he felt in any way badly treated.Longden asked for his advice as to how he could get his money back and Barber told him what he hadheard relating to Jolly. He also observed that it might be an idea to regard the mangle as his own,sell it and get his money that way. Longden said that he could sell it at a profit. Bunting cantherefore see that Longden was the prime mover in the affair and also that Barber never promised toassist him. Furthermore, Longden is not six guineas out of pocket and has it in his power to get themoney back. Bunting can read this letter to Longden if he wishes. Last night they finished theirquarterly business when it was agreed to call in another preacher, as there is sufficient work forthree. Bunting should speak to Mr Roberts and ask him if he can join them without delay. Barberintends visiting both Roberts and [William] Myles tomorrow.

Barber did not hear one word from Manchester [head of the circuit] until last Sunday when a notewas received from [Joseph] Entwisle, in which he mentioned holding a meeting of the preachers[stationed in the Manchester District?] towards the end of October or at the beginning of November.When he arrived here, Barber found that the circuit was in great debt but they were able last nightto report a balance due to the stewards of between twenty and thirty pounds. Barber's wife joins insending love

Note

  • Henry Longden (1754-1812) was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire. As ayoung man he was apprenticed to a razor maker and earned local fame as the champion prize fighter ofthe district. He was a wild youth and ran away from home at the age of twenty to enlist in the army.His father brought him back and he completed his apprenticeship after which he entered his father'sbusiness, which he soon placed on a prosperous footing. Longden married and was converted in 1776,after which he became a regular worshipper at Mulberry Street Chapel. He was made a class leader andwithin a few years began to preach. Longden was a generous giver to good causes and after retiringfrom business devoted his life to evangelism and philanthropy. Source: Revd. T. Alexander Seed,Norfolk Street Wesleyan Chapel, Sheffield (1907), pp.107-111
  • William Myles (1756-1828) was an Irish Methodist who was convertedby John Wesley in Limerick in 1773. He itinerated at his own expense from 1777 to 1782 when hebecame the first Irish preacher to be received into full connexion. Thereafter he served almostentirely in England. Myles was a gifted linguist who can be regarded as the first Methodisthistorian. His Chronological History was published in 1798 and he also published sermons and anaccount of William Grimshaw. Source:Encyclopedia of WorldMethodism (1974)

Note

Note

  • Henry Longden (1754-1812) was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire. As ayoung man he was apprenticed to a razor maker and earned local fame as the champion prize fighter ofthe district. He was a wild youth and ran away from home at the age of twenty to enlist in the army.His father brought him back and he completed his apprenticeship after which he entered his father'sbusiness, which he soon placed on a prosperous footing. Longden married and was converted in 1776,after which he became a regular worshipper at Mulberry Street Chapel. He was made a class leader andwithin a few years began to preach. Longden was a generous giver to good causes and after retiringfrom business devoted his life to evangelism and philanthropy. Source: Revd. T. Alexander Seed,Norfolk Street Wesleyan Chapel, Sheffield (1907), pp.107-111
  • William Myles (1756-1828) was an Irish Methodist who was convertedby John Wesley in Limerick in 1773. He itinerated at his own expense from 1777 to 1782 when hebecame the first Irish preacher to be received into full connexion. Thereafter he served almostentirely in England. Myles was a gifted linguist who can be regarded as the first Methodisthistorian. His Chronological History was published in 1798 and he also published sermons and anaccount of William Grimshaw. Source:Encyclopedia of WorldMethodism (1974)