letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 PLP 3/24/9
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 PLP 3/24/9
  • Dates of Creation
      5 Sep1811
  • Physical Description
      1 item

Scope and Content

From Hull to George Marsden in Albion Street, Leeds. [Atmore’s daughter] Maria would haveinformed Marsden by a note sent with the man who returned the mare, that they arrived safely after apleasant journey. They had a kind reception from several of the people who called upon them theevening of their arrival.

The Atmores were agreeably surprised to discover that their lodging was like a little palace.The people here have obviously been busy in papering, whitewashing,painting, mending beds, gettingnew chairs, carpets etc.

All their boxes have arrived safely and they have been busy unpacking and putting things inorder. Atmore’s study is in the greatest confusion with books lying everywhere. The man ishowever preparing a book case for him, so he should be very comfortable in a few days. They havealso got a servant from the country and if present appearances are anything to go by, she will dovery well. Atmore’s dear wife [Harriet] seems to be quite at home already.

Atmore commenced his preaching here last Sunday morning in George Yard [Chapel] from Psalms62:5. He also preached at Scott Street at ten from Hebrew 13:10 and administered Communion to alarge number of people who all seemed to be most affected. ‘The chapels were well-filled, butthe large congregation was at Geo Yard in the evening’. He preached from Col. 3:11 and againon Monday evening. On Tuesday night he met the classes and again last evening.

He has found the ‘member’ [member of Parliament?] here very free and communicative.He says confidentially that he has heard that Mr [William] Wilberforce has heard that he has‘displeased the M [Methodists] in the business of Ld [Lord?] S. and is quite distressed[?],fearing he shall lose his seat for Y. [York]!!’.

Reference is made to Marsden promising the people here that he would ask at the next Conferenceto come to Hull. [Harriet] says that Marsden promised her the same and Atmore, the President, saysthat he must come and if he has anything to do with it, Marsden will be appointed here next year. Hereally cannot do without Marsden’s assistance. He has no-one here like-minded who he canconsult.

‘If I cannot prevail on the ground of friendship, surely I shall on the ground ofimportunity[?], I long to see the circular - I want to be at it...’

In a postscript, he asks Marsden to ask Brother [Thomas?] Simpson if Atmore has paid him for thegig [small carriage], and if he did not, Marsden should settle the bill for him. It was tenshillings and six pence.

Note

  • John Sundius Stamp (b.1799) was the son of the Wesleyan ministerJohn Stamp (d.1831) and the brother of William Stamp, President of Conference in 1860. He waseducated at Woodhouse Grove School from 1812 and trained as a doctor, becoming a member of the RoyalCollege of Surgeons. In 1821 he entered the Wesleyan ministry and served as a circuit minister inEngland until his appointment as assistant Connexional Editor in 1842. Stamp also served asTreasurer of the Children's Fund from 1837 to 1848. He left the ministry in 1848. Source: History ofKingswood School by three old boys (1898), p.173, The Story of Woodhouse Grove School by F.Pritchard (1978), p.1,Hill's Arrangement 1847 andMinutes of Conference 1849
  • William Smith (d.1824) was a prominent Newcastle Methodist and LayPreacher. He was married to Jane Vazeille the step daughter of John Wesley. Source: Methodist Magazine 1824
  • William Hunter (1728-97) was born in the village of Placey,Northumberland. He was greatly affected by the preaching of Christopher Hopper in 1744 and wasfinally converted. Hunter began to preach locally and founded a small society before entering theitinerancy in 1767. His active circuit ministry was exercised in the North of England and Scotland.He superannuated in 1794, first to Hexham and then Alnwick where he died a few days after preachinghis last sermon. Source: Methodist Memorial by Charles Atmore (London 1871), 110-116, andAn Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan MethodistPreachers...1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick
  • John Brettel (1742-97) was born at Stourbridge in Worcestershire.At the age of twenty he came under Methodist influence and despite much opposition from his family,joined the Birmingham Society and was converted four years later. He began to preach locally andentered the itinerancy in 1771. His active circuit ministry was spent in Wales, Northern Ireland andEngland. Brettel died at Otley in Yorkshire. Source: Methodist Memorial by Charles Atmore (London1871), 37-38, andAn Alphabetical Arrangement of WesleyanMethodist Preachers...1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick

Note

Note

  • John Sundius Stamp (b.1799) was the son of the Wesleyan ministerJohn Stamp (d.1831) and the brother of William Stamp, President of Conference in 1860. He waseducated at Woodhouse Grove School from 1812 and trained as a doctor, becoming a member of the RoyalCollege of Surgeons. In 1821 he entered the Wesleyan ministry and served as a circuit minister inEngland until his appointment as assistant Connexional Editor in 1842. Stamp also served asTreasurer of the Children's Fund from 1837 to 1848. He left the ministry in 1848. Source: History ofKingswood School by three old boys (1898), p.173, The Story of Woodhouse Grove School by F.Pritchard (1978), p.1,Hill's Arrangement 1847 andMinutes of Conference 1849
  • William Smith (d.1824) was a prominent Newcastle Methodist and LayPreacher. He was married to Jane Vazeille the step daughter of John Wesley. Source: Methodist Magazine 1824
  • William Hunter (1728-97) was born in the village of Placey,Northumberland. He was greatly affected by the preaching of Christopher Hopper in 1744 and wasfinally converted. Hunter began to preach locally and founded a small society before entering theitinerancy in 1767. His active circuit ministry was exercised in the North of England and Scotland.He superannuated in 1794, first to Hexham and then Alnwick where he died a few days after preachinghis last sermon. Source: Methodist Memorial by Charles Atmore (London 1871), 110-116, andAn Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan MethodistPreachers...1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick
  • John Brettel (1742-97) was born at Stourbridge in Worcestershire.At the age of twenty he came under Methodist influence and despite much opposition from his family,joined the Birmingham Society and was converted four years later. He began to preach locally andentered the itinerancy in 1771. His active circuit ministry was spent in Wales, Northern Ireland andEngland. Brettel died at Otley in Yorkshire. Source: Methodist Memorial by Charles Atmore (London1871), 37-38, andAn Alphabetical Arrangement of WesleyanMethodist Preachers...1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick