letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 PLP 3/14/30
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 PLP 3/14/30
  • Dates of Creation
      9 May 1842[postmark]
  • Physical Description
      1 item

Scope and Content

From 12 Virginia Terrace, Dover Road, [London] to Myles Dixon in Longton, Staffordshire. Athertonknows that it would be ‘perfectly useless’ to apply to either [Jabez] Bunting or [John]Hannah to supply his place [Bunting and Hannah were champions of a brand of leadership withinWesleyan Methodism, to which Atherton was opposed]. ‘No person who has attained to 40 years ofage [Atherton may mean years in the ministry, rather than personal age], ought to be set to preachon a special occasion on an afternoon when he has to exercise again in the evening. To preach at allafter dinner requires a man to be beside himself. What do you do on Sunday morning, the best part ofGod’s day in the potteries? [The Potteries was the term applied to the area of the NorthMidlands including Staffordshire, where one of the principal industries was the manufacture ofceramics.] Well let that pass...’ If Dixon writes to George Cubitt at 22 Brunswick Place, CityRoad, he [Cubitt] has engaged to supply ‘my lack of service on the 29th’. Dixon shouldknow that Cubitt is no ‘common man. He is sub editor of that popular periodical The Wesleyan Magazine and is the author of various clever& able reviews etc etc. I hope that with his assistance, we shall get out of our difficulties;and should I be spared & appointed for Liverpool as I expect. I will remember you at youranniversaries...’

Note

  • Myles Dixon (1786-1857) was born at Broughton in Furness and joinedthe Methodists in 1805. He was ordained at the Conference of 1809 and spent seven years as amissionary in the West Indies. He returned to England in 1816 and exercised an active circuitministry in 1850 when he was compelled by an attack of paralysis to become a supernumary. He retiredto Hanley in the Midlands. Source:Minutes of Conference1858 andHill’s Arrangement 1853
  • John Hannah (1792-1867) was born at Lincoln. He entered theWesleyan ministry in 1814 and volunteered to accompany Dr Thomas Coke to India, but the lack of avacancy in the India mission meant that Hannah entered home work instead. Hannah was a highlyregarded minister who in 1824, received the distinction of accompanying Richard Reece, therepresentative of the British Conference to the American General Conference. In 1834 he wasappointed Divinity Tutor at the newly founded Theological Institution and served as Secretary ofConference at intervals from 1840. Hannah was elected President of Conference in 1842 and 1851 andin 1856 travelled to America as the representative of the British Church. From 1842 until the end ofhis life, Hannah was Divinity Tutor at Didsbury College. Source: Minutes of Conference 1867

Note

Note

  • Myles Dixon (1786-1857) was born at Broughton in Furness and joinedthe Methodists in 1805. He was ordained at the Conference of 1809 and spent seven years as amissionary in the West Indies. He returned to England in 1816 and exercised an active circuitministry in 1850 when he was compelled by an attack of paralysis to become a supernumary. He retiredto Hanley in the Midlands. Source:Minutes of Conference1858 andHill’s Arrangement 1853
  • John Hannah (1792-1867) was born at Lincoln. He entered theWesleyan ministry in 1814 and volunteered to accompany Dr Thomas Coke to India, but the lack of avacancy in the India mission meant that Hannah entered home work instead. Hannah was a highlyregarded minister who in 1824, received the distinction of accompanying Richard Reece, therepresentative of the British Conference to the American General Conference. In 1834 he wasappointed Divinity Tutor at the newly founded Theological Institution and served as Secretary ofConference at intervals from 1840. Hannah was elected President of Conference in 1842 and 1851 andin 1856 travelled to America as the representative of the British Church. From 1842 until the end ofhis life, Hannah was Divinity Tutor at Didsbury College. Source: Minutes of Conference 1867