Letter

Scope and Content

From [Hugh] Carter in Nantwich, Cheshire to S. [Sister Mary?] Tooth at Madeley. Mrs Beeston, formerly of Rains Lane, has asked him to drop Tooth a line on her behalf. She has heard of Tooth's visit to Mrs Rowell[?] at Hinstock and is very anxious that Tooth come the extra ten miles to see her at [unreadable placename] the next time that she visits Rowell. She wants instruction in the way of holiness from someone to whom she can 'unbosam her soul'. Spiritual matters are discussed in detail.

There are many ways in which this circuit may be called 'respectable', but the number of those willing to be 'singularly Holy' is very small. There are a few however and Mrs Beeston may be classed in their number. The Devil is playing his customary game in this circuit of having fine chapels with large debts hanging over them. The problem is how to get out from under the burden. There is also a tendency to please the congregations rather than 'make them displeased with their conformity to a world which is at enmity with God'.

Carter has made a few attempts to raise the awareness of members to living with God by the following:

a. Circulating among them the 'directions for remembering their covenant with God…'

b. By raising the subject as much as possible in society meetings. Spiritual matters are discussed in great detail.

Mrs Carter and their child pass on their regards to Tooth and her sister. They would like to see them in Nantwich at some time. His love should be sent to his friends in Shifnall

Note

  • Hugh Carter (1784-1855) was bom near Mold in Flintshire, although his family moved to Denbigh when he was very young. His parents were devout Methodists and the Welsh ministers of the Chester circuit used to regularly preach in the family home. Carter became a Wesleyan local preacher in 1802 and joined the itinerant ministry three years later, being at first employed in Welsh language work. Carter exercised an active circuit ministry in England and Wales for fifty years. He superannuated due to ill health at the Conference of 1855 and died a few months later in Hereford. Carter was a correspondent of the female evangelist Mary Tooth. Their acquaintance probably dated from the two years which Carter spent in the Wellington circuit from 1829-30. Source: Minutes of Conference 1855, Hill's Arrangement 1853 and the Fletcher-Tooth collection at the MARC.

Note

Note

  • Hugh Carter (1784-1855) was bom near Mold in Flintshire, although his family moved to Denbigh when he was very young. His parents were devout Methodists and the Welsh ministers of the Chester circuit used to regularly preach in the family home. Carter became a Wesleyan local preacher in 1802 and joined the itinerant ministry three years later, being at first employed in Welsh language work. Carter exercised an active circuit ministry in England and Wales for fifty years. He superannuated due to ill health at the Conference of 1855 and died a few months later in Hereford. Carter was a correspondent of the female evangelist Mary Tooth. Their acquaintance probably dated from the two years which Carter spent in the Wellington circuit from 1829-30. Source: Minutes of Conference 1855, Hill's Arrangement 1853 and the Fletcher-Tooth collection at the MARC.