Letter

Scope and Content

From Samuel Warren in Chester to Mary Fletcher in Madeley. He is happy to inform Fletcher that his wife Anne was delivered of another son on the 2nd inst. and is now perfectly recovered from the ordeal, although she is still being a little cautious. Warren's heart is filled with gratitude at the divine mercy, which has shown itself at every stage of his worthless life. Spiritual matters are discussed.

It was with great anxiety that Warren first came to Chester, lest he should have lost his 'providential way' in leaving Shrewsbury at the end of his first year in the circuit there. However, his fears have gradually subsided and his path appears clear to the point where he is now convinced that he is in the place where God wants him to be.

His circuit colleague Mr [John] Oglivie is a 'pious, affectionate and agreeable man'. They have every reason to be confident that their united labours are successful and that souls are being converted and added to the Church. 'Our public band meetings are a blessed specimen of primitive Christianity.' Spiritual matters are discussed.

In a postscript, Warren adds that Anne sends her affectionate regards. Their regards should also be passed to Mary Tooth and to other friends who may enquire after them such as Mr Hopkins, Mr Lowe and Mr James. They are expecting Dr [Thomas] Coke to visit Chester in about a fortnight.

Notes

  • Samuel Warren (1781-1862) was born in the Ardwick district of Manchester. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1802, after spending several years at sea including a period as a French prisoner. Warren exercised an active circuit ministry for over thirty years and was well-respected for his talents. He was also a considerable scholar who received the degrees of MA and DD from the University of Glasgow. In 1834 Warren was suspended for leading agitation against the decision to set up a theological institution. He lost a lawsuit contesting control of Oldham Street Chapel in Manchester and was expelled from the Connexion in 1835. Warren was followed out of Wesleyan Methodism by eight thousand supporters and the Wesleyan Methodist Association was the result. Warren served as the first President but left two years later over a dispute concerning the constitution of the new church. Warren was subsequently ordained into the Anglican ministry and became Vicar of Ancoats in Manchester. Warren's son Samuel junior later achieved distinction as a novelist, lawyer and Member of Parliament. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974), Oliver Beckerlegge, United Methodist Ministers and their Circuits 1797-1932 (1968) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)
  • John Oglivie (1763-1839) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1782 and exercised an active circuit ministry for nearly forty years in Scotland and the North of England. Oglivie superannuated to Bristol in 1821. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1838 (1974)John Lenton's database of Wesleyan itinerant preachers (GCAH website)

Note

Notes

  • Samuel Warren (1781-1862) was born in the Ardwick district of Manchester. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1802, after spending several years at sea including a period as a French prisoner. Warren exercised an active circuit ministry for over thirty years and was well-respected for his talents. He was also a considerable scholar who received the degrees of MA and DD from the University of Glasgow. In 1834 Warren was suspended for leading agitation against the decision to set up a theological institution. He lost a lawsuit contesting control of Oldham Street Chapel in Manchester and was expelled from the Connexion in 1835. Warren was followed out of Wesleyan Methodism by eight thousand supporters and the Wesleyan Methodist Association was the result. Warren served as the first President but left two years later over a dispute concerning the constitution of the new church. Warren was subsequently ordained into the Anglican ministry and became Vicar of Ancoats in Manchester. Warren's son Samuel junior later achieved distinction as a novelist, lawyer and Member of Parliament. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974), Oliver Beckerlegge, United Methodist Ministers and their Circuits 1797-1932 (1968) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)
  • John Oglivie (1763-1839) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1782 and exercised an active circuit ministry for nearly forty years in Scotland and the North of England. Oglivie superannuated to Bristol in 1821. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1838 (1974)John Lenton's database of Wesleyan itinerant preachers (GCAH website)