Letter

Scope and Content

From Newcastle under Lyme to Mary Fletcher. He was very grateful for Fletcher's letter and for his place in her prayers. 'This may be one reason why God so inlarged my heart in preaching his blessed word, what is preaching unless we feel it applyd to our souls, as we are communicating it to others we begin to see the fruits of our labours'.

Last Sunday they had ten people meeting in class for the first time, three of them old men whose total age amounted to two hundred and sixty years. Spiritual matters are discussed in detail.

He remembers Fletcher and [Mary] Tooth in his prayers.

Hopkins received a letter last week from B. [Brother George] Lowe - he has two rooms in Congleton. He says that they have a good chapel, a large congregation and nearly three hundred in the society. 'He has had some good seasons of late, and is much better than when in Shropshire. He invites me to come over and I think I shall; as we go within seven miles of Congleton'.

Hopkins's wife and family send their love. 'May God bless you with a comfortable winter, that you may be able to attend to your little flocks'.

In a postscript, he adds that he will mention it to a few of the friends, although he is confident that there will be no complaint on that score.

Note

  • George Lowe (1750-1839) was born in Levenshulme, Manchester and was converted under the ministry of the Wesleyan preacher Samuel Bardsley. Lowe entered the itinerancy in 1788 and exercised an active ministry until superannuation due to declining health in 1808. Lowe spent his retirement at Congleton in Cheshire. Source: Minutes of Conference 1840

Note

Note

  • George Lowe (1750-1839) was born in Levenshulme, Manchester and was converted under the ministry of the Wesleyan preacher Samuel Bardsley. Lowe entered the itinerancy in 1788 and exercised an active ministry until superannuation due to declining health in 1808. Lowe spent his retirement at Congleton in Cheshire. Source: Minutes of Conference 1840