Letter

Scope and Content

From Wrexham. He was much obliged for her kind letter in late March. The delay in replying was caused in part by Tooth's kind enquiry after his children. Griffiths was in expectation of soon seeing Richard and he thought that he could then best answer her enquiry.

Last week they had their District meeting at Liverpool and Richard met him there on his way home. Griffiths is pleased to be able to report that his son is well and so is Mary. They both retain a very fond recollection of Tooth and send their love.

Griffiths's lodging at Liverpool was at Mrs Hill's in Clarence Street where he found Mr Lonsdale in a state of widowhood and eccentric in his habits, but hopefully 'given up to God'. He has built a place of worship which he has called the Mariners' Church and he himself is acting as the minister. He apparently devotes his time to God and the sailors.

Mrs Hill has been confined to her home by illness for many months, but has gone into the country for the sake of her health on medical advice, so that Griffiths did not actually see her.

They had a very 'comfortable' District meeting. Among other things, [George] Marsden [stationed in Liverpool] was required to give an account of his recent marriage. [Charles] Janion [stationed in Stafford] is another one who has recently married a very young woman - Janion has five young children.

Griffiths was very pleased by the account of the prosperity of the Lord's work in Madeley. In the Liverpool District, they are doing well in some places despite the determined efforts of Dr [Samuel] Warren and his allies. In Wrexham they stand fast to a man, but much harm has been done in some rural places.

Griffiths was sorry to hear the news about [William] Stones but was not surprised as his health has not been good for a long time.

Richard will have to return very soon. As he came via Liverpool and took up what little time is allowed him, they will be obliged to send him the quickest route back. They can now go to Birmingham in a day [by rail?] when previously it would have taken three. Further details of the journey are given.

Griffiths expects to be at [the Birmingham] Conference and hopes to see Tooth there. He does not yet know where he will lodge at Conference as his sister has now gone off to her new and grand house which is more than four miles from Cherry Street on the Bristol [road].

Notes

  • The letter is written on the back of a circuit plan for the Wrexham circuit, May to July 1836
  • The Warrenite controversy exploded over the question of the establishment of a Theological Institution and Jabez Bunting's presidency of it. The opposition was led by the prominent Wesleyan minister Dr Samuel Warren and was centred in the North of England. Warren was expelled in 1835 and took with him about eight thousand supporters to found the Wesleyan Methodist Association. Source: Methodist historical
  • Mrs Hill (1761-1848) was converted to Methodism early in life despite the opposition of her friends and family. She was a close friend of John and Mary Fletcher and corresponded with many Methodist ministers. Hill served as a class leader in the Liverpool society. At the time of her death from influenza, her residence was in Clarence Street, Liverpool. Source: Methodist Magazine 1848, p.222

Note

Notes

  • The letter is written on the back of a circuit plan for the Wrexham circuit, May to July 1836
  • The Warrenite controversy exploded over the question of the establishment of a Theological Institution and Jabez Bunting's presidency of it. The opposition was led by the prominent Wesleyan minister Dr Samuel Warren and was centred in the North of England. Warren was expelled in 1835 and took with him about eight thousand supporters to found the Wesleyan Methodist Association. Source: Methodist historical
  • Mrs Hill (1761-1848) was converted to Methodism early in life despite the opposition of her friends and family. She was a close friend of John and Mary Fletcher and corresponded with many Methodist ministers. Hill served as a class leader in the Liverpool society. At the time of her death from influenza, her residence was in Clarence Street, Liverpool. Source: Methodist Magazine 1848, p.222