Letter

Scope and Content

To [Mary Bosanquet]. The reason why March did not come yesterday was because she was ‘but indifferent’ [unwell] and she therefore sent Betty [servant girl?] to find out how Bosanquet and [Sarah] Ryan were doing. If she [Ryan] is well enough to talk, March will try to come over sometime today, but if [Ryan] is still very ill, she thinks that she will not, unless she can be of service.

Spiritual matters are discussed in detail, with particular regard to March’s spiritual condition. She has been very tried and tempted of late but the Lord has given her the victory. Her soul begins to love temptation and she finds that her faith and strength are increased. March thinks that she has a deeper and more intimate acquaintance with the Lord. She was much blessed in reading the following passage in [James] Hervey’s Tombs yesterday:

“I accept ye o my people, ye are they that hath believed in my name, ye are they that hath renounced yrselves & are compleat in me…”

Spiritual matters are further discussed in detail.

March is writing to [Sarah] Crosby tonight so Bosanquet should let her know any news concerning [Sarah] Ryan’s condition.

Dated Saturday morning 25 July [1767] [This letter must pre-date Ryan’s death in 1768. 25 July fell on a Saturday in 1767.]

Note

  • James Hervey (1714-1758) was born in Hardingstone, Northamptonshire, the son of an Anglican minister. He was educated at Northampton Grammar School and Lincoln College Oxford where he was a member of the Holy Club. Hervey was ordained in 1737 and served several curacies until 1743 when he became his father's curate at the parish of Weston Favell. Hervey maintained his friendships from his Oxford years, particularly with George Whitefield and incorporated some aspects of Methodist practice in his ministry. After his father's death in 1752, Hervey succeeded him as Rector. Hervey was a leading Anglican exponent of Calvinism and published several books of religious verse, meditations and reflections which were heavily influenced by Calvinist theology. He had a sharp disagreement with John Wesley over doctrinal matters and broke off their friendship in 1755. They were never reconciled. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995).

Note

Note

  • James Hervey (1714-1758) was born in Hardingstone, Northamptonshire, the son of an Anglican minister. He was educated at Northampton Grammar School and Lincoln College Oxford where he was a member of the Holy Club. Hervey was ordained in 1737 and served several curacies until 1743 when he became his father's curate at the parish of Weston Favell. Hervey maintained his friendships from his Oxford years, particularly with George Whitefield and incorporated some aspects of Methodist practice in his ministry. After his father's death in 1752, Hervey succeeded him as Rector. Hervey was a leading Anglican exponent of Calvinism and published several books of religious verse, meditations and reflections which were heavily influenced by Calvinist theology. He had a sharp disagreement with John Wesley over doctrinal matters and broke off their friendship in 1755. They were never reconciled. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995).