Letter

Scope and Content

From Charles Bosanquet at Hampstead, London, to [his aunt Mary] Fletcher at Madeley, Shropshire. As Fletcher's dividend with the 'long ann' [long annuities?] will be payable next week, he has sent her a power of attorney to be executed by her to enable Bosanquet or his brother Samuel to receive it at the bank. Her signature must be witnessed by two people, who must state in addition to their names, their occupation and place of abode.

Madeley is described in the power of attorney as in Warwickshire - he does not know whether this is correct.

The eldest [son] of the late [Samuel Robert] Gaussen, Fletcher's great-nephew [Samuel Robert junior] has just married the third daughter of [William] Francks, [Cecilia] who is Fletcher's great niece. Her eldest sister [Mary] was married two years ago to 'young Whatman' [Rev. Richard Whittingham]; both these parties were therefore first cousins and represent a good argument in favour of such intermarriages despite common opinion being against them. It is to be hoped that the union of Samuel Robert Gaussen and Cecilia Francks will be additional proof that popular opinion is in this case wrong. The death of Gaussen's elder brother brought him into a situation for which he was not originally intended and for which his education was not exactly suitable. Moreover he was a late entrant to the university and was forced to leave early because of his father's death.

Fletcher is not well acquainted with the younger generation of her relations, but such details will hopefully not be devoid of interest.

His mother [Eleanor] enjoys reasonable health

Note

  • The Gaussens and Franks were prominent families of Hertfordshire and relations by marriage of Mary Bosanquet-Fletcher. Source: Burke's Landed Gentry, volume 1 (1898)

Note

Note

  • The Gaussens and Franks were prominent families of Hertfordshire and relations by marriage of Mary Bosanquet-Fletcher. Source: Burke's Landed Gentry, volume 1 (1898)