Letter

Scope and Content

From Mrs L. Gordon in Manchester to [Mary] Tooth. They were very grateful to receive the gift of [Mary] Fletcher's works - they will be very valuable.

Reference is made to Miss Crowther and the indisposition of Crowther's sister. It gave them all pleasure to hear of Tooth's safe arrival.

Mr Williamson may visit Ketley this Autumn, and if so, he will call on Tooth. Mr Ellis continues in his partiality for the Church.

Gordon's dear brother in his letter hopes that the visit of their religious friends will prove a blessing. Gordon has attended no other place of worship since then, nor lost sight of an opportunity. Mr Gordon unfortunately is too late at the counting house to allow him to attend of an evening, but he has accompanied them to both chapels on a Sunday. Last Sunday she drunk tea with a sick friend in the neighbourhood of Grosvenor Street [Chapel] and was greatly surprised to hear a delightful [unreadable word] from [John] Stephens - his text was "Let the love of God dwell in you…".

Mrs Lomas and children have gone to Southport. Everyone was pleased and there was no disappointment at not hearing [Robert] Newton, who they thought would be preaching. Mr Lomas asked to be remembered to Tooth and her sister [Rosamund] and so the Gaulters and many others.

Sarah has been and still very poorly - she has benefitted from spending a few days about eight miles in the countryside but is again beginning to fail.

Reference is made to Mrs Williams and [Gordon's] brother. She hopes to visit them next Summer.

Gordon is suffering greatly from heart palpitations and indeed they have probably increased since Tooth visited her.

Poor Henry is leaving them and will deliver this letter to Tooth. He appears to have a kind nature and has accompanied them to the chapel. Had he been a girl, Gordon could have kept him but a boy was not practical.

Gordon's regards should be passed to [Rosamund] and to Mr Sumner. Mr Gordon also sends his best wishes.

Notes

  • Robert Newton (1780-1854) was born at Roxby in Yorkshire. He was converted as a teenager and was admitted to the Wesleyan ministry on probation at the age of nineteen. Newton was a brilliant public speaker and fund-raiser whose great popularity necessitated his release from ordinary ministerial duties so that he could make full use of his talents. He was four times elected President of the Wesleyan Conference (1824, 1832, 1840 and 1848) and was secretary of the Conference on nineteen occasions. In 1840 he attended the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States. Newton was a close associate of Jabez Bunting and was a champion of the conservative wing of the Wesleyan Church. He was superannuated in 1852 and died at Easingwold in Yorkshire. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Methodist Magazine 1854, pp.857-858
  • John Stephens (1772-1841) was born in St Dennis, Cornwall. He joined the Methodists at an early age and was accepted for the ministry at the age of twenty, after working as a tin miner. Stephens was a highly regarded circuit minister and preacher, who was elected President of Conference in 1827. As President, Stephens proved a firm supporter of traditional Wesleyan polity. Stephens was forced by ill health to become a supernumary in 1834. He spent his last years in London. Source: Minutes of Conference 1841, Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)

Note

Notes

  • Robert Newton (1780-1854) was born at Roxby in Yorkshire. He was converted as a teenager and was admitted to the Wesleyan ministry on probation at the age of nineteen. Newton was a brilliant public speaker and fund-raiser whose great popularity necessitated his release from ordinary ministerial duties so that he could make full use of his talents. He was four times elected President of the Wesleyan Conference (1824, 1832, 1840 and 1848) and was secretary of the Conference on nineteen occasions. In 1840 he attended the General Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church in the United States. Newton was a close associate of Jabez Bunting and was a champion of the conservative wing of the Wesleyan Church. He was superannuated in 1852 and died at Easingwold in Yorkshire. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Methodist Magazine 1854, pp.857-858
  • John Stephens (1772-1841) was born in St Dennis, Cornwall. He joined the Methodists at an early age and was accepted for the ministry at the age of twenty, after working as a tin miner. Stephens was a highly regarded circuit minister and preacher, who was elected President of Conference in 1827. As President, Stephens proved a firm supporter of traditional Wesleyan polity. Stephens was forced by ill health to become a supernumary in 1834. He spent his last years in London. Source: Minutes of Conference 1841, Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)