Letter

  • This material is held at
  • Reference
      GB 133 MAM/FL/3/7/12
  • Former Reference
      GB 135 MAM/FL/3/7/12
  • Dates of Creation
      1834 [postmark - possibly May 30]

Scope and Content

From Norwich. Some very important events have occurred in Gregson's family since she last wrote. Her brother-in-law [Henry] Francis and his nephew Mr West have been greatly deceived by a [business] partner called Turner, with whom they have been associated for some years and who has turned out to be a complete villain. He has defrauded them over a long period of time of a substantial amount of money. Without going into detail, the sum which has been stolen from clients, friends etc, amounts to more than £50,000. The rogue went to London, saying that he would be detained there on business for a week or more. When he did not return and no communication was received, a confidential friend went to look for him but with no luck and there is still no news as to his whereabouts. It is supposed that he has either fled the country with a large sum of money or lost a fortune at the gaming tables, which they have heard he was in the habit of frequenting. Turner has left his wife penniless although she has been taken in by a nephew. The firm has been bankrupted by this turn of events.

Gregson's sister [Ann] and her husband [Henry Francis] bear the loss with commendable fortitude, although they feel very much for the many clients who will suffer heavily. Spiritual matters are discussed.

Gregson herself had no money invested in the business, so she is untouched financially. Of course, Gregson's sister and brother-in-law are welcome to remain with her for as long as it suits them.

If Tooth visits London this year, Gregson hopes that she will break her journey in Norfolk. One day's journey will bring her to Norwich and she would be most welcome to remain with them in Calvert Street. Everyone would be overjoyed to see her. 'There is a large field for usefulness in our Lord's cause, we want very much some ACTIVE Christians amongst us'. Gregson hopes to see [Ann] Jordan about the first week in [missing word beginning with J] and perhaps Tooth and Jordan could plan their journeys so that they could return together.

It has been their missionary meeting week - two days at Norwich and one at [Great] Yarmouth. They had two visiting ministers, Jacob Stanley and [George] Cubitt. It was a wonderful meeting. Gregson was invited to meet the preachers afterwards 'but felt no inclination for a party, or I should have invited them, but I did not then know that Mr S. [Jacob Stanley?] was a friend of yours…'

Sarah Boyce to Mary Tooth

Since she last wrote, Boyce has had great sufferings in her body and also with her family, so that she is seldom able to write. 'I have had great trials from professors [of religion - Methodists opposed to a female ministry?] and many things said [unreadable word] of me that greeved my soul. My friends that were kind to me are all dead…' Spiritual matters are discussed.

Boyce is now living in Norwich close to Gregson's and also to the chapel, but her weakness is so great that she can rarely attend there. She can no longer speak in public, but the Lord's will be done. Boyce often mourns over this wicked city. She often meets with her good friend Gregson. Spiritual matters are discussed.

Notes

  • George Cubitt (1791-1850) was born in Norwich, Norfolk. His family moved to Sheffield in Yorkshire and Cubitt was converted at Carver Street Chapel in 1808. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1813 and served for three years as a missionary in Newfoundland from 1816. His overseas ministry was cut short by ill health and he returned to home circuits in 1819. Cubitt was appointed Connexional Editor in 1842, a position which he held until his death which occurred in London after a short illness. Cubitt was a prolific writer who was widely esteemed in his own time, but whose work has now been largely forgotten. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Methodist Magazine 1851, pp.915-916
  • Jacob Stanley (1776-1851) was born at Alnwick, Northumberland. He was converted at the age of eleven and after moving to London, began to preach locally. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1797 and exercised an active circuit ministry for fifty years. Stanley served as President of Conference in 1845. He was an opponent of the dominance of Jabez Bunting. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Methodist Magazine 1851, pp.913-914

Note

Notes

  • George Cubitt (1791-1850) was born in Norwich, Norfolk. His family moved to Sheffield in Yorkshire and Cubitt was converted at Carver Street Chapel in 1808. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1813 and served for three years as a missionary in Newfoundland from 1816. His overseas ministry was cut short by ill health and he returned to home circuits in 1819. Cubitt was appointed Connexional Editor in 1842, a position which he held until his death which occurred in London after a short illness. Cubitt was a prolific writer who was widely esteemed in his own time, but whose work has now been largely forgotten. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Methodist Magazine 1851, pp.915-916
  • Jacob Stanley (1776-1851) was born at Alnwick, Northumberland. He was converted at the age of eleven and after moving to London, began to preach locally. He entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1797 and exercised an active circuit ministry for fifty years. Stanley served as President of Conference in 1845. He was an opponent of the dominance of Jabez Bunting. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Methodist Magazine 1851, pp.913-914