Letter

Scope and Content

Printed stations of preachers issued by the Leeds Conference, July 1818.

Attached letter from Mary Ann Moore210 in Leeds to Mary Tooth in Madeley. She received Tooth’s letter of 29 July and appreciated all Tooth’s sentiments on friendship and affection. Moore believes that their friendship is sufficiently established to protect their relationship from ‘any undue surmises’. Moore is pleased to call Mary Fletcher’s friend, her friend also. Spiritual matters are discussed.

Moore had breakfast last week with Miss [Anne] Tripp. She is very ill and appears to ripening soon for eternity. Mr and Mrs Miles and some other preachers were also there as her house is close to the chapel yard. [Joseph] Benson saw Moore at the window – he is very well and had preached to a large crowded congregation. Benson has also travelled to several places around about Leeds to preach sermons. He left on Sunday for Hull and Halifax and takes his final leave of these parts tomorrow at Albion Street Chapel. Moore heard Benson preach a very admirable sermon there, although he spoke at times so low that not everyone could hear him. Benson is preaching at Lichfield next Sunday on his way home.

Moore dined with a large party yesterday that included [Walter] Griffith and his wife [Mary] and [Joseph] Entwisle. [Mary] Fletcher and Madeley was a principal topic of conversation and ‘her judgement in selecting a successor [Mary Tooth] was not forgotten by your old friends…’

Tooth will see from the attached list of stations where the Moores are being sent [York circuit] ‘and we can truly say it is of the Lord for we had not any choice herein’. They were set down for York by the stationing committee before they arrived at Conference to await for [Henry] Moore’s approval of the provisional appointment and as Henry ‘never chooses for himself in cases where his duty is not immediately concerned and the friends there hearing the probability of his coming there, displayed such an anxious desire… by sending a deputation and visiting[?] by all the stewards, that he promised them he would not remove himself… ‘

A visit from Tooth would give them enormous pleasure. Reference is made to Mr and Mrs [Thomas] Stanley being stationed in Sheffield and to the fact that ‘our friend Mr [Thomas] Holy continues much the same though[?] did not come to Conference’.

Notes

  • Mary Ann Moore (1754-1834) was the second wife of the Wesleyan minister Henry Moore. Her maiden name was Hind and she was described at the time of their marriage in Bristol in August 1814 as a ‘middle-aged lady, of piety, a good understanding and possessed of an independent fortune…the lady was respected and esteemed for her general urbanity, and her especial regard for the poor…’. She lived with her husband in the several circuits to which he was appointed until they moved to London in 1823. They remained there for the rest of their lives. Mary Ann died on August 16th 1834 after a long decline. She was buried at City Road Chapel. Source: The Life of the Rev. Henry Moore by Mrs Richard Smith (London: 1844),
  • Anne Tripp (1745-1823) of Leeds, was converted by Thomas Maxfield and was a Wesleyan Methodist since at least 1762. She was an intimate friend of Mary Bosanquet-Fletcher and Sarah Crosby. Tripp was one of the most senior members of the Leeds Society and served for many years as a class leader. Source: Methodist Magazine 1823, 706.
  • Joseph Benson (1748-1821) was born of farming stock at Mamerby in Cumberland. Intended by his father for the Anglican ministry, Benson received a sound classical education and became a teacher at the age of sixteen. Converted under the influence of a Methodist cousin, he was introduced to John Wesley and was appointed classics master at Kingswood School. In 1769 Benson entered St Edmund Hall Oxford but was denied Anglican orders because of his Methodist sympathies. After serving for a short time as headmaster of the Countess of Huntingdon's ministerial training college at Trevecca, he joined the Methodist itinerancy in 1771. Benson was a great favourite of John Wesley and the two often corresponded. He went on to become President of Conference in 1798 and 1810 and served as its secretary in 1805 and 1809. In 1803 Benson was appointed connexional editor and in this capacity was a major influence on the development of the Methodist Magazine. Despite his own experiences, Benson was a staunch supporter of the link with the Church of England and two of his own sons entered the Anglican priesthood. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)
  • Walter Griffith (1762-1825) was born in Clogheen, County Tipperary. He was converted by the preaching of Joseph Pilmore in 1780 while living in Dublin. Griffith entered the itinerancy in 1784. He served circuits in Ireland with great success until 1794 after which he was stationed in England. He was President of Conference in 1813. Source: Methodist Magazine 1825, p.644, Hill's Arrangement 1862 and C. F Crookshank, Methodism in Ireland, volume 1 (1885)
  • Mary Griffith (d.1827) was the second wife of the itinerant preacher Walter Griffith (1762-1825). She died at City Road in London on 24th August 1827 after a period of ill health that had commenced at about the time of her husband’s death in 1825. Source: Methodist Magazine 1827, 647
  • Thomas Stanley (1772-1832) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1795. He exercised an active circuit ministry until his death, which occurred suddenly while he was Superintendent of the 6th London Circuit after paying a visit to the home of the musician Charles Wesley. Source: Methodist Magazine 1832, p.842
  • Thomas Holy (1752-1830) was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, the eldest son of a businessman Thomas Holy and his wife Sarah. His family had early connections with Sheffield Methodism. His maternal uncle John Wilson was closely involved with the erection of the town’s second chapel in 1746 and Holy’s mother Sarah was also a devout member of the society. Holy was educated by Revd. John Ryland of Northampton and in 1766, just after leaving school, he joined the Wesleyan society. The well-known itinerant Matthew Mayer of Stockport, a close friend of the Holy family, was a particularly strong spiritual influence. Holy’s father died in 1760 and his mother passed away when the boy was sixteen, leaving him in charge of the family business and with care of his brothers and sisters. Despite his youth, Holy quickly proved himself an astute and principled businessman. During the course of his life he amassed a very large fortune. Holy remained a staunch Methodist throughout his life, although the press of business prevented him from taking on lay offices. John Wesley stayed with him during his visits to Sheffield and used to preach in front of Holy’s house. He was generous in his giving and was particularly concerned with the needs of Methodist ministers and their families. It was one of his customs for example, to present five guineas to preachers called into the itinerancy from the Sheffield circuit He was also a supporter of overseas missions and presided at one of the first public meetings of what became the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society. His greatest contribution was however the erection and maintenance of chapels. It was stated in his obituary that ‘there are few Methodist chapels…within twenty or thirty miles round Sheffield, to whose erection, or subsequent relief from debt, he did not contribute.’ His generosity was not confined to Methodist causes but encompassed all the major Protestant denominations. Holy died after a long decline on 9 November 1830 and was buried in a family vault close to Carver Street Chapel. Source: Arminian Magazine 1832, 1 and Revd. T. Alexander Seed, History of Norfolk Street Chapel and Wesleyan Methodism in Sheffield (London: [1907]).

Note

Notes

  • Mary Ann Moore (1754-1834) was the second wife of the Wesleyan minister Henry Moore. Her maiden name was Hind and she was described at the time of their marriage in Bristol in August 1814 as a ‘middle-aged lady, of piety, a good understanding and possessed of an independent fortune…the lady was respected and esteemed for her general urbanity, and her especial regard for the poor…’. She lived with her husband in the several circuits to which he was appointed until they moved to London in 1823. They remained there for the rest of their lives. Mary Ann died on August 16th 1834 after a long decline. She was buried at City Road Chapel. Source: The Life of the Rev. Henry Moore by Mrs Richard Smith (London: 1844),
  • Anne Tripp (1745-1823) of Leeds, was converted by Thomas Maxfield and was a Wesleyan Methodist since at least 1762. She was an intimate friend of Mary Bosanquet-Fletcher and Sarah Crosby. Tripp was one of the most senior members of the Leeds Society and served for many years as a class leader. Source: Methodist Magazine 1823, 706.
  • Joseph Benson (1748-1821) was born of farming stock at Mamerby in Cumberland. Intended by his father for the Anglican ministry, Benson received a sound classical education and became a teacher at the age of sixteen. Converted under the influence of a Methodist cousin, he was introduced to John Wesley and was appointed classics master at Kingswood School. In 1769 Benson entered St Edmund Hall Oxford but was denied Anglican orders because of his Methodist sympathies. After serving for a short time as headmaster of the Countess of Huntingdon's ministerial training college at Trevecca, he joined the Methodist itinerancy in 1771. Benson was a great favourite of John Wesley and the two often corresponded. He went on to become President of Conference in 1798 and 1810 and served as its secretary in 1805 and 1809. In 1803 Benson was appointed connexional editor and in this capacity was a major influence on the development of the Methodist Magazine. Despite his own experiences, Benson was a staunch supporter of the link with the Church of England and two of his own sons entered the Anglican priesthood. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)
  • Walter Griffith (1762-1825) was born in Clogheen, County Tipperary. He was converted by the preaching of Joseph Pilmore in 1780 while living in Dublin. Griffith entered the itinerancy in 1784. He served circuits in Ireland with great success until 1794 after which he was stationed in England. He was President of Conference in 1813. Source: Methodist Magazine 1825, p.644, Hill's Arrangement 1862 and C. F Crookshank, Methodism in Ireland, volume 1 (1885)
  • Mary Griffith (d.1827) was the second wife of the itinerant preacher Walter Griffith (1762-1825). She died at City Road in London on 24th August 1827 after a period of ill health that had commenced at about the time of her husband’s death in 1825. Source: Methodist Magazine 1827, 647
  • Thomas Stanley (1772-1832) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1795. He exercised an active circuit ministry until his death, which occurred suddenly while he was Superintendent of the 6th London Circuit after paying a visit to the home of the musician Charles Wesley. Source: Methodist Magazine 1832, p.842
  • Thomas Holy (1752-1830) was born in Sheffield, Yorkshire, the eldest son of a businessman Thomas Holy and his wife Sarah. His family had early connections with Sheffield Methodism. His maternal uncle John Wilson was closely involved with the erection of the town’s second chapel in 1746 and Holy’s mother Sarah was also a devout member of the society. Holy was educated by Revd. John Ryland of Northampton and in 1766, just after leaving school, he joined the Wesleyan society. The well-known itinerant Matthew Mayer of Stockport, a close friend of the Holy family, was a particularly strong spiritual influence. Holy’s father died in 1760 and his mother passed away when the boy was sixteen, leaving him in charge of the family business and with care of his brothers and sisters. Despite his youth, Holy quickly proved himself an astute and principled businessman. During the course of his life he amassed a very large fortune. Holy remained a staunch Methodist throughout his life, although the press of business prevented him from taking on lay offices. John Wesley stayed with him during his visits to Sheffield and used to preach in front of Holy’s house. He was generous in his giving and was particularly concerned with the needs of Methodist ministers and their families. It was one of his customs for example, to present five guineas to preachers called into the itinerancy from the Sheffield circuit He was also a supporter of overseas missions and presided at one of the first public meetings of what became the Wesleyan Methodist Missionary Society. His greatest contribution was however the erection and maintenance of chapels. It was stated in his obituary that ‘there are few Methodist chapels…within twenty or thirty miles round Sheffield, to whose erection, or subsequent relief from debt, he did not contribute.’ His generosity was not confined to Methodist causes but encompassed all the major Protestant denominations. Holy died after a long decline on 9 November 1830 and was buried in a family vault close to Carver Street Chapel. Source: Arminian Magazine 1832, 1 and Revd. T. Alexander Seed, History of Norfolk Street Chapel and Wesleyan Methodism in Sheffield (London: [1907]).