Letter

Scope and Content

From W[illiam] Stones in Madeley [William Stones was stationed in Madeley between 1831 and 1834] to Mary Tooth in Madeley. It would cause him extreme regret to deny a request from Tooth or any Christian friend were it in his power to comply and he will therefore agree to preach at Coalport next Thursday evening and make the collection according to Tooth’s request. He would be grateful if Tooth could publicise the appointment tomorrow. Stones also feels that he needs to make the point that, strictly speaking, before he can preach such an engagement, he must ensure that the chapel which will benefit from the collection, is a Wesleyan Methodist chapel. This is quite important as is proved by a ‘fact or two, which have come within my own knowledge’ which he will communicate to Tooth when they meet. Stones’ wife sends her regards.

Notes

  • William Stones (1788-1840) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1809 on the recommendation of the Sheffield circuit. There had been concerns about his health but ‘his master with whom he served his time [as an apprentice] declared his constitution was good, though he had a delicate appearance.’ The year before he formally entered the itinerancy, Stones had served in the Newbury circuit. After becoming an itinerant Stones exercised an active ministry in the home work until superannuation to the Madeley circuit in 1836. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1838, manuscript journal of Conference 1840 and manuscript list of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • George Story (1738-1818) was born in Harthill, Yorkshire, the son of a wheelwright. He worked in a bookseller's shop and a printer's office before joining the itinerancy in 1762. His circuit ministry of twenty-nine years was exercised in England, Scotland and Ireland. He was a successful preacher despite having a speech impediment. For twelve years from 1793 [the Conference minutes state 1792] he edited the Arminian Magazine and also had responsibility for the Conference Printing Office. Story was an intelligent man, well-versed in literature, shorthand, astronomy and trigonometry. Source: Minutes of Conference 1818 and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography edited by Donald Lewis (1995)

Note

Notes

  • William Stones (1788-1840) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1809 on the recommendation of the Sheffield circuit. There had been concerns about his health but ‘his master with whom he served his time [as an apprentice] declared his constitution was good, though he had a delicate appearance.’ The year before he formally entered the itinerancy, Stones had served in the Newbury circuit. After becoming an itinerant Stones exercised an active ministry in the home work until superannuation to the Madeley circuit in 1836. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1838, manuscript journal of Conference 1840 and manuscript list of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • George Story (1738-1818) was born in Harthill, Yorkshire, the son of a wheelwright. He worked in a bookseller's shop and a printer's office before joining the itinerancy in 1762. His circuit ministry of twenty-nine years was exercised in England, Scotland and Ireland. He was a successful preacher despite having a speech impediment. For twelve years from 1793 [the Conference minutes state 1792] he edited the Arminian Magazine and also had responsibility for the Conference Printing Office. Story was an intelligent man, well-versed in literature, shorthand, astronomy and trigonometry. Source: Minutes of Conference 1818 and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography edited by Donald Lewis (1995)