Letter

Scope and Content

From Sarah Crosby (and Anne Tripp) in Leeds, to Madeley. Crosby has not been able to write before, because of poor health and the many interruptions they encounter here. At present they are both quite healthy, although [Anne] Tripp says that her breast 'is more UNEASEY than formerly' and she has pains under her arm which makes exercise painful. Tripp believes that she is growing in grace and is enabled to trust in the Lord, who helps in troubled times. Trade is very poor here and many people are setting up in the same business as Tripp and Crosby, but they trust in the Lord.

Miss Tindall wrote soon after their late friend's death that Miss [Eliza Hurrel?] had asked Miss [Tindall] to advance the interest of her money, lent at Whitby 'and take it of THEM, when she cd get it'. This was on the occasion of [Hurrel's] last visit to Scarborough before she came to Leeds the last time. Miss [Tindall] could not however get more than fifteen shillings and that with trouble. Financial matters are further discussed in detail with particular regard to Tindall's attempts to recover the money. With regard to this matter, reference is made to Dr [John] Whitehead, [Alexander] Mather, [William] Blagborne, Lydia Taylor and Richard Taylor.

Reference is made to [Richard] Taylor's drunkenness - Crosby often sees him at preaching, looking about him and appearing not totally sober.

There is very good work going on here. More than one hundred people had joined at the time of changing the class tickets last quarter, and as many some time before. The new members are mostly young people. The Methodist congregations are very large and the preachers are keen to achieve the best results.

Dear Miss Rhodes had to leave here three months ago, much against her own wishes. Reference is made to her work among the young converts. She kindly gave them 110 before she left and asked that her love be passed to Fletcher. Since leaving Leeds, Rhodes has been at Sheffield, Liverpool and Manchester and is now, they hear, in Nottingham. Reference is also made to [Elizabeth] Ritchie.

[Dorothy] Downs has been very ill and seldom makes it to preaching. She sends her love.

Spiritual matters are discussed.

'We feel for your great losses; & for the poor suffering people of Switzerland & Ireland too…Surely God has answered prayer, in discovering plotts, & giveing us victory over our enimys' [reference to the Irish rebellion of 1798 and the war with France].

Spiritual matters are discussed in detail.

Note

  • Dr John Whitehead (1740-1804) was a physician at the Bethlehem Hospital in London and fora short time an itinerant preacher. He was one of John Wesley's favourite doctors and attended both John and Charles Wesley during their last illness. Whitehead also preached John Wesley's funeral sermon in City Road Chapel. As an executor of John Wesley's will, Whitehead had access to his papers and was appointed to write the official biography of Wesley, which appeared in two volumes between 1793 and 1796. He was interred in Wesley's vault at City Road. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and George John Stevenson, City Road Chapel, London, and its Associations, Historical, Biographical, and Memorial (1872), pp•377-378

Note

Note

  • Dr John Whitehead (1740-1804) was a physician at the Bethlehem Hospital in London and fora short time an itinerant preacher. He was one of John Wesley's favourite doctors and attended both John and Charles Wesley during their last illness. Whitehead also preached John Wesley's funeral sermon in City Road Chapel. As an executor of John Wesley's will, Whitehead had access to his papers and was appointed to write the official biography of Wesley, which appeared in two volumes between 1793 and 1796. He was interred in Wesley's vault at City Road. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and George John Stevenson, City Road Chapel, London, and its Associations, Historical, Biographical, and Memorial (1872), pp•377-378