Letter

Scope and Content

From John Radford in Bristol to Mary Tooth. In all probability there are some other preachers who have engaged to report to her concerning the proceedings of Conference and these are probably more qualified than Radford to provide her with information. Nevertheless as a token of his regard for her, he has decided to furnish her with the following particulars.

Last Wednesday morning [27 July 1831] more than 300 preachers gathered in Bristol King Street Chapel. Conference commenced with earnest prayer for divine direction and the pouring forth of the Holy Spirit. As in former years death and other circumstances had occasioned vacancies in the Legal Hundred. These vacancies were filled by the following preachers: [John] Anderson, [Robert] Wood, [Daniel] Campbell and William Welbourne.

The Conference then proceeded to choose the President and the honour finally fell upon George Marsden.

Dr [Adam] Clarke is not present. [Jabez] Bunting is in attendance and seems much better. [Robert] Newton is acting as Secretary.

The following preachers in the home work have died during the last year: [John] Porter, [Joseph] Agar, [William] Entwisle, [John] Morris, [Lewis] Jones, [James] Bridgnell, [William] Williams, [John] Stamp, [Thomas] Harrison, [Samuel] Kellett, and [William] Todd.

The following preachers in Ireland have died during the last year: [Robert] Strong and [James] Stuart.

The following missionaries have died: [John] Jenkins, [Richard] Marshall, [William] Pychott, [Robert J.] Snelgrove, [James] Penman junior, [William] Saxton, [Robert] Snowdall and [James] Vowles.

Radford was very pleased to hear it reported by a French brother that two ladies have translated [Mary] Fletcher’s biography into French. A copy was passed to the French Queen who perused it and ordered 24 other copies for circulation among the court.

It has been decided to build a chapel in Paris and the other morning the Missionary committee voted £50 to start a subscription list for this project.

[Walter Oke] Croggan called at Gibraltar on his way home from Zante. He has given a very pleasing account of the work in Gibraltar where a number of Spanish children are under instruction at the chapel. The work on Zante is effected by education, preaching and teaching at the mission house. It is not allowed under the laws of that country to build a chapel on the island.

In the foreign missions during the last year there has been a membership increase of 1477. The increase at home has not yet been calculated.

Radford often thinks of Tooth and her sister [Rosamund].

The Methodists have been doing well in Radford’s last circuit [Salisbury]. He gave upwards of 50 notes of admission to the society and his superintendent almost as many. Radford will return to Salisbury, God willing.

Notes

  • John Anderson (1791-1840) was born in Gibraltar but came to England at an early age and was educated in London. He was converted at the age of nineteen and joined the Methodist society immediately after. Anderson entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1812 and swiftly achieved a strong reputation for pulpit oratory particularly on missionary platforms. His ministry was spent in England. Anderson became a member of the Legal Hundred at the Conference of 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1840 and MAM/FL/6/2/15
  • Robert Wood (d.1851) was the son of James Wood (1751-1840), twice President of the Wesleyan Conference. He was educated at Kingswood School and entered the ministry in 1811. He exercised an active circuit ministry until shortly before his death and was appointed to the Legal Hundred at the 1831 Conference. Source: Methodist Magazine 1851, pp.1012-1013 and MAM/FL/6/2/15
  • Daniel Campbell (1771-1835) entered the itinerancy in 1798. He served as a missionary in Jamaica and suffered persecution including imprisonment. After his return to England in 1805 he exercised an active circuit ministry until poor health forced him to superannuate in 1833. He spent the last twelve months of his life in London where he continued to preach in local churches until his final illness. He died on 21 April 1835. Source: Minutes of Conference 1835 and Hills Arrangement
  • William Welbourne (1770-1850) was born into an Anglican family near Malton in Yorkshire. He was converted at the age of twenty under the ministry of the preacher William Percival. Welbourne entered the itinerancy in 1798 and exercised an active circuit ministry in England and Scotland until superannuation due to old age in 1837. He was appointed to the Legal Hundred in 1831. His retirement was spent in the Canterbury and Lowestoft circuits. He died on 25 July 1850. Source: Minutes of Conference 1850 and Hills Arrangement 1827
  • George Marsden (1772-1858) was born in Manchester, of Methodist parentage. He entered the Wesleyan ministry in 1793 and served as a circuit minister for nearly fifty years, mainly in the north-west of England. A close friend of Jabez Bunting, Marsden was one of the leading ministers of his generation. He served as Missionary secretary (1816-18), secretary of Conference (1820) and President of the Canadian Conference in 1833. He was also President of the Wesleyan Conference in 1821 and 1831. Marsden was superannuated in 1842 and died near Glossop in Derbishire two weeks after preaching his last sermon. Source: Arminian Magazine 1858, p.576 and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)
  • John Porter (1805-1831) was converted at the age of fifteen. After working as a local preacher he entered the itinerancy in 1830 and was appointed to the Downham circuit. Porter had worked in the circuit for only a few weeks when his health failed. He died after a short illness on 5 July 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • Joseph Agar (1789-1830) was converted at an early age and entered the itinerancy in 1810 on the recommendation of the Easingwold circuit in Yorkshire. He was described in the recommendation as well-educated and was apparently a man of private fortune (conference obituary). His active circuit ministry was spent primarily in the North-West of England. Agar died after a short illness on 23 August 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hill’s Arrangement 1827and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • William Entwisle (1799-1831) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1820 and served as a master at Kingswood School until 1823 when he entered the circuit ministry. He died after a long period of ill health. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831 and Hill's Arrangement 1827
  • John Morris (1791-1830) was converted in early life and entered the itinerancy in 1813. He exercised an active circuit ministry in the North of England until his death on 11 November 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831 and Hill's Arrangement 1827
  • Lewis Jones (1784-1830) was born in Lanegrin, Monmouthshire. He entered the itinerancy in 1810 with a recommendation from the Dolgellau circuit and exercised his circuit ministry in Wales until his death on 15 November 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hill’s Arrangement 1827and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • James Bridgnell (1767-1831) entered the itinerancy in 1792 and exercised an active circuit ministry in Scotland and the North of England until superannuation in 1825. He spent his retirement in West Bromwich and died suddenly on 2 May 1831 Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hills Arrangement 1827
  • William Williams (1804-1831) entered the itinerancy in 1829 as an urgent replacement in the Dudley circuit for the late Samuel Entwisle. He was appointed in 1830 to the Newtown circuit where he caught a cold which developed into ‘consumption’ and resulted in his death on 5 July 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • John Stamp (1762-1831) entered the itinerancy in 1787 and exercised an active circuit ministry until 1824 when he was appointed to the governorship of Woodhouse Grove School in Yorkshire where he remained until his death on May 1 1831. Source: Hill’s Arrangement 1827and Minutes of Conference 1831
  • Thomas Harrison (1756-1830) was converted as a young man and entered the itinerancy in 1790. His active circuit ministry in Scotland and the North of England until superannuation due to ill health in 1820. Harrison spent his retirement in the Addingham circuit and died on 18 October 1830. Source: Hill’s Arrangement 1827and Minutes of Conference 1831
  • Samuel Kellett (1783-1831) was born in Yeadon, Yorkshire. He was converted in early life and entered the itinerancy in 1811 with a recommendation from the Bingley circuit. He exercised an active circuit ministry in the North of England until his death in the Bedale circuit on 8 July 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hill’s Arrangement 1827and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • William Todd (1781-1830) entered the itinerant ministry in 1804 and exercised an active circuit ministry in the Isle of Man and the North of England until superannuation in 1825 to Malton in Yorkshire. He died on 8 September 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hills Arrangement 1827
  • Robert Strong (1778-1831) was converted in early life and entered the Irish itinerancy in 1802. He died on 2 March 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • James Stuart ((1754-1831) was born in Enniskillen, Ireland. As a young man he moved to Dublin and was converted under the ministry of James Rogers and Mr Peacock. He entered the Irish itinerancy in 1792 and, with the exception of one year, remained in the ministry for the rest of his life. Stuart superannuated at the 1830 Conference and died on 28 March 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • John Jenkins (d.1830) was converted in early life and volunteered for missionary work in 1821. He was appointed to the West Indies and laboured in Jamaica and the Bahamas until recurrent fever forced him to return home where he died on 9 August 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hills Arrangement 1827
  • Richard Marshall (1803-1830) was born in Northumberland. After his conversion, he felt a call to overseas mission and after labouring as a local preacher for two years, he was recommended to the 1828 Conference by the Newcastle circuit. In his testimonial it was stated that he offered himself for work anywhere in the world but that he wished to remain in the home work for a period of two to four years and be allowed to marry before going abroad. In 1829 Marshall was sent as a missionary to the Gambia in West Africa. He died suddenly on 19 August 1830 a few days before leaving for England. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831 and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • William Pichott (1801-1826) was recommended to the 1826 Conference by the London South circuit. Pichott volunteered for overseas missions and was appointed that same year to the West Indies. He died of fever on 20 March 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831 and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • Robert J. Snelgrove (d.1830) entered the itinerancy in 1830 and was appointed to the North Brunswick District of British North America (Canada). He drowned on his outward voyage when he fell overboard during a gale off the Newfoundland banks. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • James Penman junior (1803-1830) was a son of the Wesleyan minister of the same name. He was educated at Kingswood School and entered the itinerancy in 1826 on the recommendation of the Evesham circuit. After two years in the British circuit ministry, Penman volunteered for the overseas missions. He was appointed to Jamaica and arrived there from England in March 1829. He died on 8 November 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hill’s Arrangement 1827and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • William Saxton (1803-1830) entered the itinerancy in 1829 on the recommendation of the Rochester circuit after serving three years as a local preacher. Saxton volunteered for the foreign missions and was appointed to Jamaica that same year. He died at Bellmont on 27 November 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831 and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • Robert Snowdall (d.1831) entered the itinerancy in 1824 and volunteered for the foreign missions. He was appointed to South Africa and served there for the rest of his life. Snowdall died following a short illness on 24 March 1831 while travelling from Graham’s Town to Bootschnaap in the Boschuana country. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • James Vowles (1806-1830) was a native of Bath. His parents were devout and Vowles was converted at the age of fifteen. He worked as a local preacher for two years and entered the itinerancy in 1828. Vowles offered for the overseas missions and arrived in Jamaica in March 1829. In 1830 he was posted to the island’s Port Antonio circuit where he died from fever on 16 August 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • Walter Oke Croggan (1791-1854) was born in Penryn, Cornwall, the son of devout Baptists. He was converted at the age of nineteen by the preaching of the Wesleyan ministers John Woodrow and Anthony Seckerson. After labouring as a local preacher, Croggan entered the itinerancy in 1817 on the recommendation of his native Truro circuit. His testimonial described him as a man of good education and ‘engaging manners’. Croggan was stationed in Cornish circuits from 1817 to 1822 and was then accepted for the foreign missions. He served in France until 1826 and was then posted to the island of Zante in Greece where he remained until 1834. He returned to England and spent two years in the Kingswood circuit. Croggan then spent fourteen years as Superintendent of Irish Missions and Schools before re-entering home circuit work. He died on 30 January 1854. Source: Minutes of Conference 1854, Hills Arrangement 1853 and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)

Note

Notes

  • John Anderson (1791-1840) was born in Gibraltar but came to England at an early age and was educated in London. He was converted at the age of nineteen and joined the Methodist society immediately after. Anderson entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1812 and swiftly achieved a strong reputation for pulpit oratory particularly on missionary platforms. His ministry was spent in England. Anderson became a member of the Legal Hundred at the Conference of 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1840 and MAM/FL/6/2/15
  • Robert Wood (d.1851) was the son of James Wood (1751-1840), twice President of the Wesleyan Conference. He was educated at Kingswood School and entered the ministry in 1811. He exercised an active circuit ministry until shortly before his death and was appointed to the Legal Hundred at the 1831 Conference. Source: Methodist Magazine 1851, pp.1012-1013 and MAM/FL/6/2/15
  • Daniel Campbell (1771-1835) entered the itinerancy in 1798. He served as a missionary in Jamaica and suffered persecution including imprisonment. After his return to England in 1805 he exercised an active circuit ministry until poor health forced him to superannuate in 1833. He spent the last twelve months of his life in London where he continued to preach in local churches until his final illness. He died on 21 April 1835. Source: Minutes of Conference 1835 and Hills Arrangement
  • William Welbourne (1770-1850) was born into an Anglican family near Malton in Yorkshire. He was converted at the age of twenty under the ministry of the preacher William Percival. Welbourne entered the itinerancy in 1798 and exercised an active circuit ministry in England and Scotland until superannuation due to old age in 1837. He was appointed to the Legal Hundred in 1831. His retirement was spent in the Canterbury and Lowestoft circuits. He died on 25 July 1850. Source: Minutes of Conference 1850 and Hills Arrangement 1827
  • George Marsden (1772-1858) was born in Manchester, of Methodist parentage. He entered the Wesleyan ministry in 1793 and served as a circuit minister for nearly fifty years, mainly in the north-west of England. A close friend of Jabez Bunting, Marsden was one of the leading ministers of his generation. He served as Missionary secretary (1816-18), secretary of Conference (1820) and President of the Canadian Conference in 1833. He was also President of the Wesleyan Conference in 1821 and 1831. Marsden was superannuated in 1842 and died near Glossop in Derbishire two weeks after preaching his last sermon. Source: Arminian Magazine 1858, p.576 and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)
  • John Porter (1805-1831) was converted at the age of fifteen. After working as a local preacher he entered the itinerancy in 1830 and was appointed to the Downham circuit. Porter had worked in the circuit for only a few weeks when his health failed. He died after a short illness on 5 July 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • Joseph Agar (1789-1830) was converted at an early age and entered the itinerancy in 1810 on the recommendation of the Easingwold circuit in Yorkshire. He was described in the recommendation as well-educated and was apparently a man of private fortune (conference obituary). His active circuit ministry was spent primarily in the North-West of England. Agar died after a short illness on 23 August 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hill’s Arrangement 1827and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • William Entwisle (1799-1831) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1820 and served as a master at Kingswood School until 1823 when he entered the circuit ministry. He died after a long period of ill health. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831 and Hill's Arrangement 1827
  • John Morris (1791-1830) was converted in early life and entered the itinerancy in 1813. He exercised an active circuit ministry in the North of England until his death on 11 November 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831 and Hill's Arrangement 1827
  • Lewis Jones (1784-1830) was born in Lanegrin, Monmouthshire. He entered the itinerancy in 1810 with a recommendation from the Dolgellau circuit and exercised his circuit ministry in Wales until his death on 15 November 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hill’s Arrangement 1827and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • James Bridgnell (1767-1831) entered the itinerancy in 1792 and exercised an active circuit ministry in Scotland and the North of England until superannuation in 1825. He spent his retirement in West Bromwich and died suddenly on 2 May 1831 Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hills Arrangement 1827
  • William Williams (1804-1831) entered the itinerancy in 1829 as an urgent replacement in the Dudley circuit for the late Samuel Entwisle. He was appointed in 1830 to the Newtown circuit where he caught a cold which developed into ‘consumption’ and resulted in his death on 5 July 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • John Stamp (1762-1831) entered the itinerancy in 1787 and exercised an active circuit ministry until 1824 when he was appointed to the governorship of Woodhouse Grove School in Yorkshire where he remained until his death on May 1 1831. Source: Hill’s Arrangement 1827and Minutes of Conference 1831
  • Thomas Harrison (1756-1830) was converted as a young man and entered the itinerancy in 1790. His active circuit ministry in Scotland and the North of England until superannuation due to ill health in 1820. Harrison spent his retirement in the Addingham circuit and died on 18 October 1830. Source: Hill’s Arrangement 1827and Minutes of Conference 1831
  • Samuel Kellett (1783-1831) was born in Yeadon, Yorkshire. He was converted in early life and entered the itinerancy in 1811 with a recommendation from the Bingley circuit. He exercised an active circuit ministry in the North of England until his death in the Bedale circuit on 8 July 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hill’s Arrangement 1827and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • William Todd (1781-1830) entered the itinerant ministry in 1804 and exercised an active circuit ministry in the Isle of Man and the North of England until superannuation in 1825 to Malton in Yorkshire. He died on 8 September 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hills Arrangement 1827
  • Robert Strong (1778-1831) was converted in early life and entered the Irish itinerancy in 1802. He died on 2 March 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • James Stuart ((1754-1831) was born in Enniskillen, Ireland. As a young man he moved to Dublin and was converted under the ministry of James Rogers and Mr Peacock. He entered the Irish itinerancy in 1792 and, with the exception of one year, remained in the ministry for the rest of his life. Stuart superannuated at the 1830 Conference and died on 28 March 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • John Jenkins (d.1830) was converted in early life and volunteered for missionary work in 1821. He was appointed to the West Indies and laboured in Jamaica and the Bahamas until recurrent fever forced him to return home where he died on 9 August 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hills Arrangement 1827
  • Richard Marshall (1803-1830) was born in Northumberland. After his conversion, he felt a call to overseas mission and after labouring as a local preacher for two years, he was recommended to the 1828 Conference by the Newcastle circuit. In his testimonial it was stated that he offered himself for work anywhere in the world but that he wished to remain in the home work for a period of two to four years and be allowed to marry before going abroad. In 1829 Marshall was sent as a missionary to the Gambia in West Africa. He died suddenly on 19 August 1830 a few days before leaving for England. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831 and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • William Pichott (1801-1826) was recommended to the 1826 Conference by the London South circuit. Pichott volunteered for overseas missions and was appointed that same year to the West Indies. He died of fever on 20 March 1831. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831 and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • Robert J. Snelgrove (d.1830) entered the itinerancy in 1830 and was appointed to the North Brunswick District of British North America (Canada). He drowned on his outward voyage when he fell overboard during a gale off the Newfoundland banks. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • James Penman junior (1803-1830) was a son of the Wesleyan minister of the same name. He was educated at Kingswood School and entered the itinerancy in 1826 on the recommendation of the Evesham circuit. After two years in the British circuit ministry, Penman volunteered for the overseas missions. He was appointed to Jamaica and arrived there from England in March 1829. He died on 8 November 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831, Hill’s Arrangement 1827and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • William Saxton (1803-1830) entered the itinerancy in 1829 on the recommendation of the Rochester circuit after serving three years as a local preacher. Saxton volunteered for the foreign missions and was appointed to Jamaica that same year. He died at Bellmont on 27 November 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831 and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)
  • Robert Snowdall (d.1831) entered the itinerancy in 1824 and volunteered for the foreign missions. He was appointed to South Africa and served there for the rest of his life. Snowdall died following a short illness on 24 March 1831 while travelling from Graham’s Town to Bootschnaap in the Boschuana country. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • James Vowles (1806-1830) was a native of Bath. His parents were devout and Vowles was converted at the age of fifteen. He worked as a local preacher for two years and entered the itinerancy in 1828. Vowles offered for the overseas missions and arrived in Jamaica in March 1829. In 1830 he was posted to the island’s Port Antonio circuit where he died from fever on 16 August 1830. Source: Minutes of Conference 1831
  • Walter Oke Croggan (1791-1854) was born in Penryn, Cornwall, the son of devout Baptists. He was converted at the age of nineteen by the preaching of the Wesleyan ministers John Woodrow and Anthony Seckerson. After labouring as a local preacher, Croggan entered the itinerancy in 1817 on the recommendation of his native Truro circuit. His testimonial described him as a man of good education and ‘engaging manners’. Croggan was stationed in Cornish circuits from 1817 to 1822 and was then accepted for the foreign missions. He served in France until 1826 and was then posted to the island of Zante in Greece where he remained until 1834. He returned to England and spent two years in the Kingswood circuit. Croggan then spent fourteen years as Superintendent of Irish Missions and Schools before re-entering home circuit work. He died on 30 January 1854. Source: Minutes of Conference 1854, Hills Arrangement 1853 and List of Wesleyan Preachers on Trial 1803-1831 (MARC)