Letter

Scope and Content

From London to Mary Tooth. She received Tooth’s letter with feelings of gratutude and emotion.

Spiritual matters are discussed in detail. Jenkins was surprised to read that [Robert] Heys [second minister in the Madeley circuit] had preached at Alscott. May the Lord reward him for his labours. Reference is made to Tooth meeting thirty people in class meetings, which news gave her particular pleasure as she was afraid that the classes were discontinued as she had no news of them before Tooth’s letter.

She is very much obliged to Mr Hinterman[?] for [unreadable word – ‘manning?] the Sunday School – she had intended to mention it to Tooth, for ever since she came to London, she has witnessed the good things that arise from these institutions and was convinced that they must start a similar work at home.

Jenkins has been to see Mrs [Mary Ann] Moore once only since it is three miles to where she lives. She likes her and her husband Henry very much and who should she meet there but dear [Joseph] and [Lucy] Entwisle with whom she spent a very pleasant evening. She also heard Mr Moore preach at City Road Chapel after Entwisle preached there in the morning – Jenkins did not however have the pleasure of hearing him [Entwisle]. Jenkins was also introduced to Miss [Sarah] Wesley the other day and liked her very much – she is like the pictures that Jenkins has seen of her father [Charles Wesley]. Jenkins has not yet seen her brother Mr C. [Charles] Wesley but hopes to have that pleasure before she leaves London. Miss Wesley spoke of Tooth and asked Jenkins several questions about her and concluded by saying that she hoped Tooth would call and see her if she was ever in London. She lives with her brother [Charles] at 79 Gloucester Place, Marylebone. In conversation, Wesley also said that she would like a pretty country house and garden as she is tired of London. Jenkins told her of Wykenhouse and she seemed to like her description of it and was impressed by the small rent, but said that it was too far from London as her brother plays the organ at Marylebone Parish Church.

Miss Jones sends her regards as does Mrs Ball and her family. Mrs Ball wants Tooth’s advice and will no doubt write soon – she seems very unhappy in London and wishes to move away. Jenkins has told her that as her [Jenkins] mother has proposed that Wyken should be divided for two families, then maybe Ball and Miss Bywater could join together. They are both in the same business and could live in one half of the house and operate their business from the other half. Ball’s answer was that she would write to Miss Tooth for her advice.

Jenkins is very anxious to see Tooth and all her dear friends in Shropshire. It seems a long time to have been absent from home.

[Much of the rest of the letter has been cut out]

[In the Wesley family papers, there is a letter of 17 May 1825 from Sally Wesley to the wealthy lay Methodist William Marriott, recommending Jenkins as a person suitable to undertake the duties of governess. She is described as being of delicate health but of good character, capable of teaching French, Geography, Maths and ‘works’ DDWF14/46]

Notes

  • Mary Ann Moore (1754-1834) was the second wife of the Wesleyan minister Henry Moore and the sister of Lucy Entwisle, wife of the Wesleyan minister Joseph Entwisle. Her maiden name was Hind and she was described at the time of their marriage in Bristol in August 1814 as a ‘middle-aged lady, of piety, a good understanding and possessed of an independent fortune…the lady was respected and esteemed for her general urbanity, and her especial regard for the poor…’. She lived with her husband in the several circuits to which he was appointed until they moved to London in 1823. They remained there for the rest of their lives. Mary Ann died on August 16th 1834 after a long decline. She was buried at City Road Chapel. Source: The Life of the Rev. Henry Moore by Mrs Richard Smith (London 1844), 264, 310-311, Methodist Magazine 1834, 720, George John Stevenson, City Road Chapel, London, and its Associations, Historical, Biographical, and Memorial (1872), 429-430 and information provided by John Lenton.
  • Henry Moore (1751-1844) was born at Drumcondra near Dublin, the son of a farmer. Moore was apprenticed to a wood cutter and opened a school in Dublin after his conversion in 1777. He entered the itinerancy in 1779 and served first in Ireland and then England. Moore was well-regarded by John Wesley and in 1789 he became one of the first preachers to be ordained for the work in England. He was also appointed one of Wesley's literary executors, and was the author with Thomas Coke of one of the first biographies to be published after Wesley's death. Moore was a champion of conservative Wesleyanism in the early 19th century. He was twice President of Conference (1804 and 1823) and remained in the active ministry until 1833. He is buried at City Road Chapel in London. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)
  • Joseph Entwisle (1767-1841) was born in Manchester of Presbyterian and High Church stock. He began preaching at the age of sixteen and entered the itinerancy in 1787. Entwisle was responsible in 1802 for the introduction of stricter regulations for the testing of ministerial candidates and in 1804 became the secretary of the first Wesleyan Missionary Committee. He served as President of Conference in 1812 and 1825 and as the first house governor of the Theological Institution between 1834 and 1838. He died at Tadcaster in Yorkshire three years after retirement. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)

Note

Notes

  • Mary Ann Moore (1754-1834) was the second wife of the Wesleyan minister Henry Moore and the sister of Lucy Entwisle, wife of the Wesleyan minister Joseph Entwisle. Her maiden name was Hind and she was described at the time of their marriage in Bristol in August 1814 as a ‘middle-aged lady, of piety, a good understanding and possessed of an independent fortune…the lady was respected and esteemed for her general urbanity, and her especial regard for the poor…’. She lived with her husband in the several circuits to which he was appointed until they moved to London in 1823. They remained there for the rest of their lives. Mary Ann died on August 16th 1834 after a long decline. She was buried at City Road Chapel. Source: The Life of the Rev. Henry Moore by Mrs Richard Smith (London 1844), 264, 310-311, Methodist Magazine 1834, 720, George John Stevenson, City Road Chapel, London, and its Associations, Historical, Biographical, and Memorial (1872), 429-430 and information provided by John Lenton.
  • Henry Moore (1751-1844) was born at Drumcondra near Dublin, the son of a farmer. Moore was apprenticed to a wood cutter and opened a school in Dublin after his conversion in 1777. He entered the itinerancy in 1779 and served first in Ireland and then England. Moore was well-regarded by John Wesley and in 1789 he became one of the first preachers to be ordained for the work in England. He was also appointed one of Wesley's literary executors, and was the author with Thomas Coke of one of the first biographies to be published after Wesley's death. Moore was a champion of conservative Wesleyanism in the early 19th century. He was twice President of Conference (1804 and 1823) and remained in the active ministry until 1833. He is buried at City Road Chapel in London. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)
  • Joseph Entwisle (1767-1841) was born in Manchester of Presbyterian and High Church stock. He began preaching at the age of sixteen and entered the itinerancy in 1787. Entwisle was responsible in 1802 for the introduction of stricter regulations for the testing of ministerial candidates and in 1804 became the secretary of the first Wesleyan Missionary Committee. He served as President of Conference in 1812 and 1825 and as the first house governor of the Theological Institution between 1834 and 1838. He died at Tadcaster in Yorkshire three years after retirement. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)