Letter

Scope and Content

From S. Huntingdon [Selina, Countess of Huntingdon] to her ‘worthy friends, the committee of Bath Chapel’ (addressed to Mr Carpenter. She was grateful for their kind enquiries concerning her health. She is feeling better. Spiritual matters are discussed in detail.

She approves of Mr Barnard’s choice and they may depend upon his ‘continuance[?] much longer’. Spiritual matters are discussed.

‘Mr [Thomas] Wills has had glorious times and multitudes attending all through Wales. I hope I may rejoice in the prospect that the Lord gives to the young men under my care at present, that our general ministry may be found very powerful.’

Her regards should be passed to all who kindly enquire after her, and particularly Mrs Elkington.

Her love should be given to Mr and Mrs Barnard. Reference is made to St John’s Parade [location of the chapel?].

Mr Carpenter should open any letters that come to her with a frank, with her seal upon it, as it will save postage to her friends in Bath.

Note

  • Thomas Wills (1740-1802) was born in Truro, Cornwall. He came under the influence of the Anglican evangelical Samuel Walker while a pupil at Truro Grammar School and was a friend of Thomas Haweis while a student at Magdalen Hall Oxford. Wills was ordained into the Church of England in 1762 and served as a curate in Samuel Walker’s parish. He met the Countess of Huntingdon in 1772 and married her neice two years later. He preached extensively for the Countess and supervised the work of her Connexion in Cornwall. Wills was appointed one of her chaplains in 1778 and after his censure by the ecclesiastical court, left the Church of England and served as the minister at the Countess’s chapel in Spa Fields, London. Wills fell out with the Countess and was dismissed in 1788. He then became the dissenting minister at Silver Street and Islington Chapels before retiring to his native county in 1799. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)

Note

Note

  • Thomas Wills (1740-1802) was born in Truro, Cornwall. He came under the influence of the Anglican evangelical Samuel Walker while a pupil at Truro Grammar School and was a friend of Thomas Haweis while a student at Magdalen Hall Oxford. Wills was ordained into the Church of England in 1762 and served as a curate in Samuel Walker’s parish. He met the Countess of Huntingdon in 1772 and married her neice two years later. He preached extensively for the Countess and supervised the work of her Connexion in Cornwall. Wills was appointed one of her chaplains in 1778 and after his censure by the ecclesiastical court, left the Church of England and served as the minister at the Countess’s chapel in Spa Fields, London. Wills fell out with the Countess and was dismissed in 1788. He then became the dissenting minister at Silver Street and Islington Chapels before retiring to his native county in 1799. Source: Dictionary of Evangelical Biography, edited by Donald Lewis (1995)