Letter

Scope and Content

From Leeds to Madeley. Reference is made to a letter which Mr W. [John Wesley] asked her to write. It took her a lot of time to recollect past events and write two large sheets of paper. Yesterday she he received well another letter from [Wesley] informing her that her letter will do very and that not many of the words need altering [for publication?]. There has however been an accident - part has been burnt before he could finish transcribing it, so he needs her to send him that part again.

She also has three guineas worth of 'elixers & balsT to prepare for Miss Tindall, which [money] is coming in very useful at present. 'As I also have for my journey to Scarbro [Scarborough]; having found it a good season for my soul, & of great service to my health: wch has removed many pressures from my mind, that I know now were occasioned by bodily disorder. I believe some frds have found it good for them, that we met also. And I think expences were only what wd have been, if I had stayd at home: for Miss [Tindall?] kindly gave me, just what paid for my board at Scarbro…' [Tindall] asked her not to tell anyone of this kindness, but Crosby thinks it only right to acquaint Fletcher 'with every kind & merciful providence; that you may unite with us to praise our Dr Lord'. Spiritual matters are discussed. They rejoiced at the news that 'you have done with money, work, & all worldly business, under your roof.

Reference is made to sending things to Fletcher, including papers. Reference is also made to financial matters, bonds and Mr Atkinson. Crosby has received a bank note for £50 from [Fletcher's brother] William Bosanquet.

They were very sorry to hear the news that poor Mr Hardy has been troubling her again at Madeley. Crosby thinks that he should be confined [to a hospital for the insane?].

It was a source of joy to hear that there is a possibility of them meeting next Summer. They long for conversations with Fletcher.

Crosby received a letter from [Elizabeth] Ritchie tonight, in which she says that she mended fast after her return. She did however catch a cold and her teeth and face were bad, but she is now much better.

Spiritual matters are discussed in detail. 'I believe you assosiate with the ministering hosts of invisible frds and are very thankful that you pray for US; who are surrounded to much with the noise & hurry of carriages, oaths & curses…'

The Lord's work is reviving here. The preachers are very popular. [John] Shaw is however very sick and some think he will die here.

Note

  • John Shaw (d.1793) entered the Methodist itinerancy in 1762 and served circuits mainly in the North of England until superannuation in 1787. He died at Pocklington in Yorkshire. Source: Minutes of Conference 1793 and An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers… 1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick

Note

Note

  • John Shaw (d.1793) entered the Methodist itinerancy in 1762 and served circuits mainly in the North of England until superannuation in 1787. He died at Pocklington in Yorkshire. Source: Minutes of Conference 1793 and An Alphabetical Arrangement of Wesleyan Methodist Preachers… 1739-1818, compiled by Kenneth Garlick