Letter

Scope and Content

From John Radford in Kington to Mary Tooth. He had assumed that she would be informed by her preachers of the day of the [district] meeting in Shrewsbury and he did not therefore think it necessary to write. He had intended riding to Madeley after the meeting but the business did not conclude until late which meant that he was unable to make the journey. Tooth will have heard from Mr W. of the discussions concerning Madeley Wood Chapel.

It would have given him much pleasure to have met with her – perhaps they will have the opportunity again while they are both still in the land of the living.

He now has the painful task of saying goodbye to his friends in this circuit. Last night the presence of God was most strongly felt and during preaching some listeners were led to cry aloud. They have had the great satisfaction of seeing many brought to God in this area. The society is getting larger although the return of names in the minutes does not reflect this as they wish to give the new people a long trial.

They have lost a great many people from the society because of removal to London and other parts of the country. There have also been several deaths recently. [Mr R. Thomas], a man similar in character to brother [Richard] Williams died a few days ago – he was a brother of the late Miss Thomas of this place who was a visitor to Madeley during the lifetime of Mary Fletcher.

Radford has written to Mr [Joseph] Griffith of Broseley to ask him to take Radford’s place in this circuit. There is little doubt that Griffith and his wife [Ann] would be very comfortable here.

He was very grateful for the gift of the Mary Fletcher manuscripts delivered by Miss Davies. He will treasure them always.

Radford’s wife joins in sending regards to Tooth and her sister [Rosamund]. His condolences should also be passed to Mrs Williams.

All being well, he will send Tooth a line from the conference in Leeds.

Radford does not yet know where he will be stationed next year. The people of Wrexham sent him a pressing invitation to go there but he declined. He would prefer an appointment close to Bristol.

Notes

  • Valentine Ward (1781-1835) was born in Madeley and was converted at the age of nineteen under the influence of a sermon preached by the Wesleyan minister Samuel Taylor and he entered the ministry himself in 1801. His Circuit ministry was spent in England and Scotland until 1832 when he volunteered for the West Indies mission. He died on March 26 1835 at Montego Bay in Jamaica. Ward is described in his Conference obituary as imprudent in some of his chapel building plans. He was a staunch supporter of overseas missions and Negro emancipation. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1832 and Minutes of Conference 1835
  • Mr R. Thomas (d.1830) of Brook Farm at Kington in Herefordshire joined the Methodist society in 1803. He remained a devout Methodist until his sudden death on 4 July 1830. Source: Methodist Magazine 1830, 646
  • Joseph Griffith (b.1785) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1809 after serving as a local preacher in the Birmingham circuit. He served as a circuit minister in England until 1838 when he is recorded in the Conference minutes as having left the Connexion. The journal records that he had been charged with immorality but declined to answer the accusation. Griffith’s wife Ann died in 1834 shortly after the death of a daughter who was also named Ann. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1838, Journal of Conference 1838, Minutes of the Methodist Conference 1838, Methodist Magazine 1834, 959 and Register of Preachers on Trial 1803-31

Note

Notes

  • Valentine Ward (1781-1835) was born in Madeley and was converted at the age of nineteen under the influence of a sermon preached by the Wesleyan minister Samuel Taylor and he entered the ministry himself in 1801. His Circuit ministry was spent in England and Scotland until 1832 when he volunteered for the West Indies mission. He died on March 26 1835 at Montego Bay in Jamaica. Ward is described in his Conference obituary as imprudent in some of his chapel building plans. He was a staunch supporter of overseas missions and Negro emancipation. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1832 and Minutes of Conference 1835
  • Mr R. Thomas (d.1830) of Brook Farm at Kington in Herefordshire joined the Methodist society in 1803. He remained a devout Methodist until his sudden death on 4 July 1830. Source: Methodist Magazine 1830, 646
  • Joseph Griffith (b.1785) entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1809 after serving as a local preacher in the Birmingham circuit. He served as a circuit minister in England until 1838 when he is recorded in the Conference minutes as having left the Connexion. The journal records that he had been charged with immorality but declined to answer the accusation. Griffith’s wife Ann died in 1834 shortly after the death of a daughter who was also named Ann. Source: Hill's Arrangement 1838, Journal of Conference 1838, Minutes of the Methodist Conference 1838, Methodist Magazine 1834, 959 and Register of Preachers on Trial 1803-31