Letter

Scope and Content

From [M. A.] Edwards in Winchester. She must ask Tooth's forgiveness for not writing sooner, but she has had troubles to contend with. Spiritual matters are discussed.

'The cause of our leaving Shepton Mallet [1826] was through not having a sympathising colleague [Josiah H. Walker] to take the part of a tried Brother, two or three of the people chose to be unpleasant in consequence of Mr E's name standing where it does on the minutes of Conference, but should not uprightness of conduct before that PERIOD [reference to disciplinary proceedings against Edwards - see MAM/FL/2/15/5], and since, have some weight with Christians professing to forgive each other…I believe there were but three persons against our remaining another year, and one of those was Mr Super!!! Therefore we thought it best to leave though many hearts were truly AFFECTED that we should be so TREATED…'

They are comfortably settled here and so far, people have been kind. [John] Stamp their Superintendent is a pleasant colleague who lives twelve miles away in Southampton. Winchester is an ancient city with a cathedral and nine [Anglican] churches, so one cannot expect Methodism to be particularly strong. There is however some prospect of doing good. [Stamp] is a popular preacher. It would be so good to have Tooth pay them a visit - she has mentioned her name and one of their 'respectable' friends urged her to invite Tooth.

Edwards has not been well since leaving Madeley. When she is in the coastal towns the air is too strong for her and she has been at times deprived of the use of her limbs through rheumatism and gout. Just before Christmas she came down with a violent cough and has had it ever since.

Spiritual matters are discussed. Her regards should be passed on to [Rosamund] Tooth.

From William Edwards to Mary Tooth

He has often urged his wife [M. A. Edwards] to write to Tooth. He was very pleased to receive the plan [preaching plan?] which Tooth sent him but was surprised to see so many names missing - what has become of Woodruff and Taylor? Is J. Deakin the same young man who formerly lived at Dawley Green? He was not a member of the Society when Edwards was in the Madeley Circuit.

It pleased God to bless his labours in Shepton Mallet [1825-26] and there is a very good prospect here in Winchester. Edwards has been enabled to form an entirely new class and they have nine or ten meetings. There are some [local preachers?] on trial, amongst whom was one young man who was a complete Deist just a few months ago - his conversion process is described. The relation of the man's experience in class the other evening seemed to melt their hearts.

A subscription has lately begun with a view to reduce the Winchester chapel debt and they already have the promise of £200 and with the help of a grant which they hope to get from the chapel fund, they expect to be able to reduce the debt by[?] £400 which will be of great importance to the Winchester Circuit.

Their regards should be passed to Mr [Benjamin] and Mrs Longmore, Mr and Mrs [Richard?] Williams, Mr and Mrs Gething[?], Mrs Milne, Mrs Hartshorn, Mr and Mrs Ward etc. Where is Mrs Boden?

One of their friends in S. told him that her father, who died not long ago, was converted through [Mary] Fletcher when at Birstall.

Stamp presents his respects and has asked for the kind favour of one or two lines of [John] Fletcher's handwriting

Notes

  • Josiah H. Walker (1776-1843) was born in London. He was converted at an early age and entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1804. He exercised his circuit ministry in England until superannuation due to failing health in 1838. He retired to Manchester where he suffered from a paralytic attack and died on July 26 1843. Source: Minutes of Conference 1843
  • Benjamin Longmore (1779-1826) was born at Coalbrookdale in Shropshire. His parents were converted through the ministry of John Fletcher and joined the Methodist Society. Benjamin himself was converted in 1799 after hearing a sermon preached at Madeley by Dr Thomas Coke. At about the same time he began to attend the Sunday morning meetings led by the famous female evangelist Mary Fletcher, the widow of John Fletcher. From 1804 he was employed as a commercial traveller by the Coalbrookdale Company and remained with them for the rest of his life. He married Miss Lacon, a tradesman's daughter, in Oswestry in 1812. Benjamin was appointed a class leader in 1816 or 1817 He fell ill in November 1826 and was forced to cut short a business trip to Abergavenny and return home. He was diagnosed as having typhoid and died on December 10. Source: Arminian Magazine 1828, pp.578-585
  • John Sundius Stamp (b.1799) was the son of the Wesleyan minister John Stamp (d.1831) and the brother of William Stamp, President of Conference in 1860. He was educated at Woodhouse Grove School from 1812 and trained as a doctor, becoming a member of the Royal College of Surgeons. In 1821 he entered the Wesleyan ministry and served as a circuit minister in England until his appointment as assistant Connexional Editor in 1842. Stamp also served as Treasurer of the Children's Fund from 1837 to 1848. He left the ministry in 1848. Source: History of Kingswood School by three old boys (1898), p.173, The Story of Woodhouse Grove School by F. Pritchard (1978), p.1, Hill's Arrangement 1847 and Minutes of Conference 1849

Note

Notes

  • Josiah H. Walker (1776-1843) was born in London. He was converted at an early age and entered the Wesleyan itinerancy in 1804. He exercised his circuit ministry in England until superannuation due to failing health in 1838. He retired to Manchester where he suffered from a paralytic attack and died on July 26 1843. Source: Minutes of Conference 1843
  • Benjamin Longmore (1779-1826) was born at Coalbrookdale in Shropshire. His parents were converted through the ministry of John Fletcher and joined the Methodist Society. Benjamin himself was converted in 1799 after hearing a sermon preached at Madeley by Dr Thomas Coke. At about the same time he began to attend the Sunday morning meetings led by the famous female evangelist Mary Fletcher, the widow of John Fletcher. From 1804 he was employed as a commercial traveller by the Coalbrookdale Company and remained with them for the rest of his life. He married Miss Lacon, a tradesman's daughter, in Oswestry in 1812. Benjamin was appointed a class leader in 1816 or 1817 He fell ill in November 1826 and was forced to cut short a business trip to Abergavenny and return home. He was diagnosed as having typhoid and died on December 10. Source: Arminian Magazine 1828, pp.578-585
  • John Sundius Stamp (b.1799) was the son of the Wesleyan minister John Stamp (d.1831) and the brother of William Stamp, President of Conference in 1860. He was educated at Woodhouse Grove School from 1812 and trained as a doctor, becoming a member of the Royal College of Surgeons. In 1821 he entered the Wesleyan ministry and served as a circuit minister in England until his appointment as assistant Connexional Editor in 1842. Stamp also served as Treasurer of the Children's Fund from 1837 to 1848. He left the ministry in 1848. Source: History of Kingswood School by three old boys (1898), p.173, The Story of Woodhouse Grove School by F. Pritchard (1978), p.1, Hill's Arrangement 1847 and Minutes of Conference 1849