Letter

Scope and Content

From Charles Bosanquet at Southsea, Essex, to [his aunt Mary] Fletcher at Madeley, Shropshire. He is anxious to discover what she knows about a French annuity on her life, which she does not appear to have received of late for no reason that he can think of, except lack of effort. Financial matters are further discussed in detail with reference to the confiscation of part of the said annuity during the French Revolution. If he understands it right there was an annuity on the life of each of his grandfather's four children, of whom only Fletcher now remains alive. Has she any recollections of 'male perpetual annuity'?

He is aware that during the latter end of 1809 or early in 1810, she received a sum of about £28 or £29 being a quarter part of a remittance from abroad, but since then she does not appear to have received anything. He is anxious that she should have all her rights.

With his family he has spent some weeks here - it is a very pleasant quiet sea-bathing place. They return home next week to Hampstead [London] and Fletcher should therefore direct her reply to him there. He spent the evening before last with his mother [Eleanor] at Forest Hill near Leytonstone. Her health seems to be good but her spirits are low. Nothing replaces for her the friends who now she can but hope to meet in the next world.

Mrs [unreadable name] is fast losing her health, although she is either unaware of the fact or does not choose to acknowledge it. Mrs [unreadable name] is in good health. Fletcher is aware that the eldest Gaussen boy [Samuel Robert junior, son of Fletcher's nephew the late Samuel Robert Gaussen senior] has recently [1813] married one of the Francks girls [Cecilia, daughter of Fletcher's nephew William Francks]. They have a child and are very happy. The second son [Armytage], who is to enter the Anglican ministry, has married a daughter [Sarah] of Admiral Sotheby who Bosanquet has not yet seen.

Bosanquet's elder brother [Samuel] lost a daughter aged thirteen this Spring to the measles. He has still nine or ten children living. Bosanquet himself has six healthy children aged between nine and eighteen. His wife [Charlotte Anne] is unwell at the moment. Bosanquet's other brother [John] Bernard is either at Cheltenham with his wife [Mary Anne] or possibly at his father-in-law's [Richard Lewis] in Monmouthshire.

Note

  • Details of the Bosanquet family and their relations can be found in Burke's Landed Gentry, volume 1 (1898)

Note

Note

  • Details of the Bosanquet family and their relations can be found in Burke's Landed Gentry, volume 1 (1898)