Letter

Scope and Content

From Diane Thomas at Kington to Mary Fletcher. As Mrs Hall is travelling through Madeley, Thomas took this opportunity to ask her to carry another letter to Fletcher enquiring after her health. Thomas longs to see Fletcher in person, but fears that she never will on this side of eternity. She would have written many times before this but did not want to put Fletcher to the trouble of responding.

Thomas was very grateful for Fletcher's response to her first letter - it has been a guide to her many times. Spiritual matters are discussed in detail.

Mrs Hall is waiting, so Thomas cannot give much of an account of the work of the gospel in these parts and of her own spiritual condition. However, the Lord is extending his glorious work - they now have a preaching house in Hereford and are opening a place in Lemoten[?]. In some of the places, 'the people are very lively'.

When Thomas last spoke to Fletcher, it was from Aberystwyth. She would be very glad of a response from Fletcher.

Notes

  • Diana Thomas (1759-1821) of Kington, Herefordshire, was a friend and correspondent of Mary Fletcher. She preached for the first time during a visit to Madeley in March 1806 and travelled thereafter preaching across mid-Wales, both in Wesleyan chapels and in the open air. Thomas was authorised to preach by the Kington Quarterly meeting in 1809, which was unusual at a time when the denominational leadership was turning against the concept of female preaching. Thomas' brother was R. Thomas of Brook Farm, who joined the Wesleyan society in 1803 and died on 4 July 1830. Source: Arminian Magazine 1830, p.646., "More information on Diana Thomas" by John Lenton Proceedings of Wesley Historical Society 51 (2000), p.178-9 and Fletcher-Tooth collection (MARC)

Note

Notes

  • Diana Thomas (1759-1821) of Kington, Herefordshire, was a friend and correspondent of Mary Fletcher. She preached for the first time during a visit to Madeley in March 1806 and travelled thereafter preaching across mid-Wales, both in Wesleyan chapels and in the open air. Thomas was authorised to preach by the Kington Quarterly meeting in 1809, which was unusual at a time when the denominational leadership was turning against the concept of female preaching. Thomas' brother was R. Thomas of Brook Farm, who joined the Wesleyan society in 1803 and died on 4 July 1830. Source: Arminian Magazine 1830, p.646., "More information on Diana Thomas" by John Lenton Proceedings of Wesley Historical Society 51 (2000), p.178-9 and Fletcher-Tooth collection (MARC)