Letter

Scope and Content

From W. Carpenter in London to Mary Tooth at Madeley. Carpenter hopes that Tooth will not attribute the long silence, to either ingratitude or neglect but finding that she would not be able to deliver Tooth's parcels before Saturday, she thought that she had better defer writing until after she had been to Tooth's friends. Carpenter delivered the parcel to Mrs Swindon's but as that lady was not at home, there is no message from there to report back. [Joseph] Entwisle's family have all left town fora few days and Carpenter therefore left the parcel with Mr Cardeaux. She understands that his [Entwisle's] brother was acquitted but the young man tried with him was found guilty. He was to have 'suffered' [ie hanged] on Wednesday last but he was reprieved on Tuesday evening for six days. Many believe that he will escape with transportation as he was drawn into the affair by Mr [Entwisle], who so manipulated the situation as to clear himself he persuaded the other 'to accept the bill' and was not therefore technically guilty of forgery.

Carpenter has seen Mrs Lomas from whom Tooth will receive a letter. She was happy to hear that Tooth is getting on well at Madeley. [Joseph] Benson and Blanchard had left town before Carpenter could see them, but will endeavour to do so when they return.

She trusts that the work of the Lord continues to prosper with Tooth and often recalls with gratitude the 'many blessed seasons' she enjoyed there. She does not know what to say of London. 'I hope good is doing, but we want more simplicity, and zeal in the cause of Christ'.

Carpenter hopes that she will hear good news of Tooth's health, so that she may do everything possible for the God's work.

Mr and Mrs Taylor join in sending love.

Tooth should reply to Carpenter at 20 Bentinck Street, Manchester Square, [London]

Notes

  • Joseph Entwisle (1767-1841) was born in Manchester and entered the itinerancy in 1787. He was responsible in 1802 for the introduction of stricter regulations for the testing of ministerial candidates and in 1804 became the secretary of the first Wesleyan Missionary Committee. Entwisle served as President of Conference in 1812 and 1825 and as the first house governor of the Theological Institution between 1834 and 1838. He died at Tadcaster in Yorkshire three years after retirement. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974)
  • Joseph Benson (1748-1821) was born of farming stock at Mamerby in Cumberland. Intended by his father for the Anglican ministry, Benson received a sound classical education and became a teacher at the age of sixteen. Converted under the influence of a Methodist cousin, he was introduced to John Wesley and was appointed classics master at Kingswood School. In 1769 Benson entered St Edmund Hall Oxford but was denied Anglican orders because of his Methodist sympathies. After serving fora short time as headmaster of the Countess of Huntingdon's ministerial training college at Trevecca, he joined the Methodist itinerancy in 1771. Benson was a great favourite of John Wesley and the two often corresponded. He went on to become President of Conference in 1798 and 1810 and served as its secretary in 1805 and 1809. In 1803 Benson was appointed Connexional Editor and in this capacity was a major influence on the development of the Methodist Magazine. Despite his own experiences, Benson was a staunch supporter of the link with the Church of England and two of his own sons entered the Anglican priesthood. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)

Note

Notes

  • Joseph Entwisle (1767-1841) was born in Manchester and entered the itinerancy in 1787. He was responsible in 1802 for the introduction of stricter regulations for the testing of ministerial candidates and in 1804 became the secretary of the first Wesleyan Missionary Committee. Entwisle served as President of Conference in 1812 and 1825 and as the first house governor of the Theological Institution between 1834 and 1838. He died at Tadcaster in Yorkshire three years after retirement. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974)
  • Joseph Benson (1748-1821) was born of farming stock at Mamerby in Cumberland. Intended by his father for the Anglican ministry, Benson received a sound classical education and became a teacher at the age of sixteen. Converted under the influence of a Methodist cousin, he was introduced to John Wesley and was appointed classics master at Kingswood School. In 1769 Benson entered St Edmund Hall Oxford but was denied Anglican orders because of his Methodist sympathies. After serving fora short time as headmaster of the Countess of Huntingdon's ministerial training college at Trevecca, he joined the Methodist itinerancy in 1771. Benson was a great favourite of John Wesley and the two often corresponded. He went on to become President of Conference in 1798 and 1810 and served as its secretary in 1805 and 1809. In 1803 Benson was appointed Connexional Editor and in this capacity was a major influence on the development of the Methodist Magazine. Despite his own experiences, Benson was a staunch supporter of the link with the Church of England and two of his own sons entered the Anglican priesthood. Source: Encyclopedia of World Methodism (1974) and Dictionary of Evangelical Biography 1739-1860, edited by Donald M. Lewis (1995)